T Nation

Advice For Massive Strength!

This section of the forum seems to be filled with people who are mainly interested in hypertrophy (increase in muscular bodyweight) and fat loss. There are probably some of you who are highly interested in gaining strength and strength alone. That’s great!! Here’s a tip to get you strong:

Learn how to regulate volume and intensity
-Volume (total amount of repetitions done in a training session, week, month, etc.) is very important to regulate. Often times, the more total repetitions you can do in a certain intensity range (percentage of your one repetition maximum), the better.

Training with atleast 80% intensity is a must if your goal is strength. Anything lower is bodybuilding and/or dynamic effort training. Alexander Sergeyevitch Prilepin has once created a table for proper training volume and intensity.

Christian Thibaudaeu actually revised it in his book “The Black Book of Training Secrets”. The reason why this table is effective is that every repetition that you do is performed with optimal speed. In order for your body to produce force, you need MASS and ACCELERATION.

The faster you move a heavy weight concentrically, the more force your body will produce. For more info on the Prilepin table, visit www.google.com.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:

Learn how to regulate volume and intensity
[/quote]

what is this learn you speak of? i’d rather lift heavy things to get strong, not read a brick of text.

[quote]PlayoffsOrBust wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:

Learn how to regulate volume and intensity

what is this learn you speak of? i’d rather lift heavy things to get strong, not read a brick of text.
[/quote]

I’m talking about knowing how much weight and reps you should do. You can’t just go “Mike Mentzerish” on your sets and expect to squat a ton.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
PlayoffsOrBust wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:

Learn how to regulate volume and intensity

what is this learn you speak of? i’d rather lift heavy things to get strong, not read a brick of text.

I’m talking about knowing how much weight and reps you should do. You can’t just go “Mike Mentzerish” on your sets and expect to squat a ton.[/quote]

it seemed like you were advertising something that was common sense (or EASILY attainable given the library of articles on this site) at the end.

i understand. i was just trying to be sarcastic.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
Something way too long.
[/quote]

You may as well just said “Here’s a cool chart to determine what set/rep scheme to use at a certain % of 1rm.”

And this sentence, “In order for your body to produce force, you need MASS and ACCELERATION,” just makes my head spin. Yes, we should all know that f=ma, but I really don’t know what you’re trying to say here. I need mass and acceleration to produce force? Where can I get these? :wink:

[quote]goochadamg wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
Something way too long.

You may as well just said “Here’s a cool chart to determine what set/rep scheme to use at a certain % of 1rm.”

And this sentence, “In order for your body to produce force, you need MASS and ACCELERATION,” just makes my head spin. Yes, we should all know that f=ma, but I really don’t know what you’re trying to say here. I need mass and acceleration to produce force? Where can I get these? ;)[/quote]

“The faster you move a heavy weight concentrically, the more force your body will produce.”

That’s what it’s all about.

Mass is poundage, acceleration is the bar speed, the faster you move the bar up, the better.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
goochadamg wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
Something way too long.

You may as well just said “Here’s a cool chart to determine what set/rep scheme to use at a certain % of 1rm.”

And this sentence, “In order for your body to produce force, you need MASS and ACCELERATION,” just makes my head spin. Yes, we should all know that f=ma, but I really don’t know what you’re trying to say here. I need mass and acceleration to produce force? Where can I get these? :wink:

“The faster you move a heavy weight concentrically, the more force your body will produce.”

That’s what it’s all about.

Mass is poundage, acceleration is the bar speed, the faster you move the bar up, the better.[/quote]

but my gym has a bar speed limit…dang it

[quote]Fuzzyapple wrote:

“The faster you (TRY TO) move a heavy weight concentrically, the more force your body will produce.”

but my gym has a bar speed limit…dang it
[/quote]

Actual speed doesn’t really matter…for best strength gains, one should try to move the bar as fast as possible, even if with a 90% 1RM, it won’t move at a lightening pace.

i think ur gettin confused

the bar moves faster because you apply more force

not, u move the bar faster creating more force

F=ma is a stupid, simplistic formula for anything to do with weightlifting. Muscles don’t work like that. And before any junior high nitwits chime in with their rudimentary understanding of physics, I repeat, MUSCLES don’t work that way.

Should I waste time explaining it? Or just tell everyone to go read a real book.

You can generate much more force than the acceleration you can achieve.

F = ma + heat

Muscles need to load up before they can generate max forces.

Ah screw it I am sick of explaining this stuff to people.

Read Zatiorsky

[quote]Magarhe wrote:
F=ma is a stupid, simplistic formula for anything to do with weightlifting. Muscles don’t work like that. And before any junior high nitwits chime in with their rudimentary understanding of physics, I repeat, MUSCLES don’t work that way.

Should I waste time explaining it? Or just tell everyone to go read a real book.

You can generate much more force than the acceleration you can achieve.

F = ma + heat

Muscles need to load up before they can generate max forces.

Ah screw it I am sick of explaining this stuff to people.

Read Zatiorsky[/quote]

Ahhh, Christian Thib’s book vs Zatsiorsky’s book. Interesting. I’ll be representing Christian Thibaudeau’s book.

Dare to argue with me? You seem to know what you’re talking about.

[quote]Anonymas wrote:
i think ur gettin confused

the bar moves faster because you apply more force

not, u move the bar faster creating more force[/quote]

More bar speed = More force production

More force production = More bar speed

What the heck is the difference?!

You’re not honestly putting Thib ahead of Zat? Seriously?

I have a lot of respect for Thib, he has done a lot of good work … but … seriously … I think you need to expand your understanding. It is clear to me you have a very rudimentary understanding, and I am not going to spell it out for you.

I’m a conceited mofo. Please don’t insult me.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:

Ahhh, Christian Thib’s book vs Zatsiorsky’s book. Interesting. I’ll be PARROTING Christian Thibaudeau’s book.

Dare to argue with me? You seem to know what you’re talking about.

[/quote]

There I fixed it for you.

Also the basic force eq. is only useful in describing the force acting upon the BAR. Things get considerably more complex when we consider articulating joints and muscles. Angular acceleration, torque, friction, and SHM are all involved to some extent. While a simple eq like W=F*D may give a good approximation of the net energy expended to complete a lift it says very little about the stresses applied to an individual muscle.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
I’m a conceited mofo. Please don’t insult me.[/quote]

And a stupid one at that.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
This section of the forum seems to be filled with people who are mainly interested in hypertrophy (increase in muscular bodyweight) and fat loss. There are probably some of you who are highly interested in gaining strength and strength alone. That’s great!! Here’s a tip to get you strong:

Learn how to regulate volume and intensity
-Volume (total amount of repetitions done in a training session, week, month, etc.) is very important to regulate. Often times, the more total repetitions you can do in a certain intensity range (percentage of your one repetition maximum), the better.

Training with atleast 80% intensity is a must if your goal is strength. Anything lower is bodybuilding and/or dynamic effort training. Alexander Sergeyevitch Prilepin has once created a table for proper training volume and intensity.

Christian Thibaudaeu actually revised it in his book “The Black Book of Training Secrets”. The reason why this table is effective is that every repetition that you do is performed with optimal speed. In order for your body to produce force, you need MASS and ACCELERATION.

The faster you move a heavy weight concentrically, the more force your body will produce. For more info on the Prilepin table, visit www.google.com.[/quote]

It seems to me like another random on a weightlifting website found some incredibly basic ideas, and now thinks he’s a genius.

Stop arguing just go lift heavy lol :slight_smile:

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
This section of the forum seems to be filled with people who are mainly interested in hypertrophy (increase in muscular bodyweight) and fat loss. There are probably some of you who are highly interested in gaining strength and strength alone. That’s great!! Here’s a tip to get you strong:

Learn how to regulate volume and intensity
-Volume (total amount of repetitions done in a training session, week, month, etc.) is very important to regulate. Often times, the more total repetitions you can do in a certain intensity range (percentage of your one repetition maximum), the better.

Training with atleast 80% intensity is a must if your goal is strength. Anything lower is bodybuilding and/or dynamic effort training. Alexander Sergeyevitch Prilepin has once created a table for proper training volume and intensity.

Christian Thibaudaeu actually revised it in his book “The Black Book of Training Secrets”. The reason why this table is effective is that every repetition that you do is performed with optimal speed. In order for your body to produce force, you need MASS and ACCELERATION.

The faster you move a heavy weight concentrically, the more force your body will produce. For more info on the Prilepin table, visit www.google.com.

It seems to me like another random on a weightlifting website found some incredibly basic ideas, and now thinks he’s a genius.[/quote]

As I said, I’m a conceited mofo.

I see you are so generously providing advice on getting massively strong. Have you had the chance to apply this great wisdom and attain massive strength for yourself?

What precisely do you have to be conceited about? Were you taught you are extremely special/unique and no one is like you in the entire world?

Instead of being conceited you might try earning people’s respect. You’d be surprised how much more it is worth. It might be hard work though.