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Advice For Deadlift Grip

my grip sucks. I can get about 350 lbs up maybe 5 times with no straps. With straps I can get close to 500 for 6.

I know the best way to improve grip is just by doing the movement, but how should I approach it.

Should I just do a set or two at the max weight I can do with out straps and then move on to my normal weight with straps? I’m not really looking for any grip specific exercises other than actual deadlift.

Any advice appreciated.

My grip sucks help but!!!

“I’m not really looking for any grip specific exercises other than actual deadlift.”

Bro you need to attack the weak spot the grip and that may mean direct grip work. Plate pinches fat bar work, supermax lock outs a holds for time as it seems your not so much looking for limit grip but grip endurance in being your not failing on a single pull but 5 reps etc.

those super max holds for time will do a ton, and the other grip stuff

Phill

Since you mentioned that you are not specifically looking for grip exercises, I suggest you work up to your working/max deadlift poundage without straps until you grip gives, then use straps for the remainder of the exercise. No point letting your grip strength limit your deadlift poundages.

I also read that using a thick bar helps improve grip strength. You can try wrapping something like a towel around your deadlift bar and then work up the weight -> grip fails, remove towel and continue pulling and increasing weight -> grip fails again, use straps and increase weight accordingly. This way you can work on your grip strength while deadlifting without doing any specific grip exercises.

I know this isn’t the answer you’re looking for, but I found the best thing for me was to split up my grip and deadlift training. I continued to deadlift and pull using straps so I would keep getting stronger with my pulls, and I devoted a second day to only work grip.

I didn’t like it at first either. I thought grip training was boring. And it was, since all I was doing for my grip was heavy barbell holds for time. It wasn’t until I switched things up that my grip strength really went up and the training became not-so-boring.

Seriously, give it a shot. It doesn’t take much time, and it can even be done on a totally separate, non-training day. Just take 15 minutes or so, twice a week and work on some plate pinches, hex holds, rolling thunder, grippers, fat bars, blobs, and so on.

I’d second the grip training day recommendation. I did a ton of heavy static holds, plate pinches and farmer’s walks once a week for a couple of months and my grip improved no end. Are you using chalk on your non-strapped sets? If not start using it. Try taping your index and middle fingers and thumb with athletic tape too.

I say this every time this question comes up: Are you using chalk?

It’s simple, but if not, start.

I’m not using chalk because I unfortunately have to go to a commercial gym and it’s not allowed.

[quote]Politico wrote:
I’m not using chalk because I unfortunately have to go to a commercial gym and it’s not allowed. [/quote]

I’d use it anyway or get a chalk substitute.

In addition to all the good advice stated above I would recommend that you learn to use the hook grip style.

[quote]Politico wrote:
I’m not using chalk because I unfortunately have to go to a commercial gym and it’s not allowed. [/quote]

http://www.plgearonline.com/grip.html

Get the gel. Problem solved.

Grip Training for your Deadlift
By James Smith (www.dieselcrew.com)
For EliteFTS

Have trouble opening jars? Your hands look someone who got smashed by a house in the Wizard of Oz? You?ve got problems. Well, fortunately you are doing something about it. You are accessing a wealth of knowledge, on the greatest Powerlifting site on the web ? www.EliteFTS.com. To increase your bench, dead and squat, one essential aspect everyone forgets ? is strengthening your grip. Gripping the bar with the strongest / tightest grip possible is essential for locking your body into a solid, weight bearing structure. There are many different types of grip strength; supporting, pinch, crush, levering, bending and tearing ? for instance. For this article we will focus on supporting strength as it pertains to your deadlift.

Here are 3 quick, simple exercises that will help increase your deadlift grip.

  1. Double ? Over-Hand Deadlifts (double pronated)

This simple adjustment to your normal alternated grip, will provide huge gains in your supporting
strength during competition and training. Take your normal deadlift stance, conventional or sumo, load down into the bar, and grasp the bar with a double over-hand grip. You will be quickly humbled by the amount of weight you can pull. Typically, a person who has never done this
will only be able to pull around only 60-70% of your 1RM, especially if you are loading with bands. The weight will roll right out of your hands! During your normal training day, use this grip until you cannot hold the bar anymore, then switch to your normal alternated grip, and finish your workout.

  1. Thick Bar Lifting

Go to the junkyard and get an 8? pipe, anything close to 2? OD (outside diameter). Take a 2 ? lb plate with you to make sure it will fit on the pipe with the least amount of free space. Use this
bar everyday; for cleans, deads (double over-hand, or alternating), military press, bent-over rows, bench or any exercise you can use a regular bar for? The finger / wrist strength you will gain from incorporating thick bar work will transfer your grip strength over to new PR?s.

  1. Wide Pinch

Working your grip in this outstretched position, will tax the endpoints on your fingers and teach
you to flex the palm of your hand. This is one of the key components to overall hand strength. How do you work wide pinch in a typical gym? Grab 3 x 25?s and place them all together, with
outer 2 ? 25?s smooth side out. Grasp the 3 x 25?s with a double over-hand grip (fingers on the outside of the stack of weights) and pick them up. Hold them for time. Not too hard? Try this: 3 x 35?s! Pick them up and hold for time. Hope you don?t plan on using utensils when you eat next, because you won?t be able to hold a fork?! For a variation, grab the 3 x 25?s or 3 x 35?s with a double under-hand grip (supinated, thumbs on the outside of the stack of weights).

Cycle these 3 tips into your training and your deadlift grip will be solid as a vise. Always throw them in at the end of your workout because you don?t want your grip to be a limiting factor for your core exercises. Believe me - your hands will be destroyed!

http://www.elitefts.com/documents/grip_training.htm

[quote]nhiron wrote:
Grip Training for your Deadlift
By James Smith (www.dieselcrew.com)
For EliteFTS

Have trouble opening jars? Your hands look someone who got smashed by a house in the Wizard of Oz? You?ve got problems. Well, fortunately you are doing something about it. You are accessing a wealth of knowledge, on the greatest Powerlifting site on the web ? www.EliteFTS.com. To increase your bench, dead and squat, one essential aspect everyone forgets ? is strengthening your grip. Gripping the bar with the strongest / tightest grip possible is essential for locking your body into a solid, weight bearing structure. There are many different types of grip strength; supporting, pinch, crush, levering, bending and tearing ? for instance. For this article we will focus on supporting strength as it pertains to your deadlift.

Here are 3 quick, simple exercises that will help increase your deadlift grip.

  1. Double ? Over-Hand Deadlifts (double pronated)

This simple adjustment to your normal alternated grip, will provide huge gains in your supporting
strength during competition and training. Take your normal deadlift stance, conventional or sumo, load down into the bar, and grasp the bar with a double over-hand grip. You will be quickly humbled by the amount of weight you can pull. Typically, a person who has never done this
will only be able to pull around only 60-70% of your 1RM, especially if you are loading with bands. The weight will roll right out of your hands! During your normal training day, use this grip until you cannot hold the bar anymore, then switch to your normal alternated grip, and finish your workout.

  1. Thick Bar Lifting

Go to the junkyard and get an 8? pipe, anything close to 2? OD (outside diameter). Take a 2 ? lb plate with you to make sure it will fit on the pipe with the least amount of free space. Use this
bar everyday; for cleans, deads (double over-hand, or alternating), military press, bent-over rows, bench or any exercise you can use a regular bar for? The finger / wrist strength you will gain from incorporating thick bar work will transfer your grip strength over to new PR?s.

  1. Wide Pinch

Working your grip in this outstretched position, will tax the endpoints on your fingers and teach
you to flex the palm of your hand. This is one of the key components to overall hand strength. How do you work wide pinch in a typical gym? Grab 3 x 25?s and place them all together, with
outer 2 ? 25?s smooth side out. Grasp the 3 x 25?s with a double over-hand grip (fingers on the outside of the stack of weights) and pick them up. Hold them for time. Not too hard? Try this: 3 x 35?s! Pick them up and hold for time. Hope you don?t plan on using utensils when you eat next, because you won?t be able to hold a fork?! For a variation, grab the 3 x 25?s or 3 x 35?s with a double under-hand grip (supinated, thumbs on the outside of the stack of weights).

Cycle these 3 tips into your training and your deadlift grip will be solid as a vise. Always throw them in at the end of your workout because you don?t want your grip to be a limiting factor for your core exercises. Believe me - your hands will be destroyed!

http://www.elitefts.com/documents/grip_training.htm [/quote]

My grip is a huge challenge with my little paws, and all james wrote is great stuff. i also have had good results from hex db holds (hold the end for time and max weight), one hand hanging from a pullup bar, farmers walks, adn a new one from elitefts, “kroc” rows. Take a dumbell and row it for high reps, like 25+. Keep going up in weight. Great finisher.

Also keep your calluses sanded down and smooth.

jack