T Nation

Advice for a Skinny Guy?


#1

Alright lads ,Just a bit about myself.
Trained for years in muay thai and mma mainly, and have lifted to help those.
Been focusing on lifting since january.
I'm 5"8, about 56kg and 18 years old.

Gained around 3-4kg since i started but after i upped the cals and sorted my diet. i'm looking for a new routine.
I hate doing programs like SS that are 3x a week full body, tried them and just not for me.
I'm on a 4 day split now, and i take one day rest every two days.

I'm looking to build muscle, last time i got my BF% done it was 7-8%.

Routine looks like this .

Day 1 - Shoulders/Triceps
Day 2 - Legs
Day 3 - Chest/Biceps
Day 4 - Back/ Traps

I focus on compounds, and they're the first exercise i do each day, and do 5x5 on squats, 3x5 on deadlifts. everything else ranges from 8-12 reps, or 6-10 if im going heavier.
I avoid machines as much as i can too.

Stats
Squat 5x5 - 82.5kg
Deadlifts 1x5- 102.5kg
Bench 50kgx5
OHP 30kg x4 8

Thanks lads!


#2

How many calories are you eating? I’m a beginner myself, but I’ve found putting back with biceps (pulling) and chest with triceps (pushing) much more convenient.


#3

[quote]ZPR1200D wrote:
How many calories are you eating? I’m a beginner myself, but I’ve found putting back with biceps (pulling) and chest with triceps (pushing) much more convenient.[/quote]

+1

push
pull
legs,

However, I would put legs on Day 1.


#4

“Lift for strength. Eat for size.”


#5

[quote]Dylan051 wrote:
Been focusing on lifting since january.
I’m 5"8, about 56kg and 18 years old.

Gained around 3-4kg since i started but after i upped the cals and sorted my diet.[/quote]
What, exactly, did you eat yesterday?

Gaining 3-4kg in 6 months is sloooow progress for someone your size. There’s absolutely no reason why you can’t see better gains once you really do sort out your diet.

How long did you try that type of program and what does “not for me” mean? You didn’t gain weight and strength even though you were eating a lot and training hard?

[quote]Day 1 - Shoulders/Triceps
Day 2 - Legs
Day 3 - Chest/Biceps
Day 4 - Back/ Traps[/quote]
First, this is laid out for bodybuilding goals. This type of split is does not prioritize your martial arts. Just so we’re clear on that. Are you still training MMA or Muay Thai? Second, doing biceps the day before back is a bad idea since there’ll be some carryover fatigue which will negatively impact your back session.

Other than that, it’s a pretty good, basic bodybuilding split. Without knowing the details (like exercises and sets), it should be good to go. Eating is going to be the top priority in deciding whether or not you build muscle.

Just curious, why?


#6

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Just curious, why?[/quote]

Because the new “truth” is that machines are bad for you. That they do not take in consideration your natural plane-of-motion and range-of-motion. Machines are ‘tailored’ after a specific body in mind and does not personalize the movement like a barbell or even better, dumbbells do.

I do agree with most of that, but machines do have their place in a workout. I like them as ‘finishers’ or as assistance work to some compound movements… for example, if you do your OHP, then jump on a smith-machine and do the same thing, you can “more safely” blast your delts, especially when walking that thin line between ‘hardcore set’ and ‘you just injured yourself’ .


#7

Just my personal advice and experience. I started years ago at about a 130 pound bodyweight at 5’9" and gained a solid 60 pounds doing nothing but Upper/Lower Splits and typical 5x5 routines (mainly Madcow 5x5). I have found for my body type squatting and benching twice per week was ideal, at some points three times per week for a short period (i.e. 4 weeks at a time).

Also eating between 3000-4000 calories per day depending on my goal at the time, I would gain a little fat and get tired of eating, and maintain for months at a time, then start gaining again-- no extreme cut or bulk crap, just doing what my body felt at the time. It does take a while, at least for me, it seemed to let my body adjust to the “new me” at some points.

Today, I have no problem maintaining between 175-180 lbs on a fairly normal diet, anything above that I will admit is VERY difficult for me to personally maintain. This has all been in my mid-twenties by the way. Best of luck.


#8

small frequent meals (rich in protein) does the trick for people i know…and of course enough sleep too!

i assume that’s common knowledge but at times, people overlook those areas (diet and sleep)