T Nation

Adductors in Anterior Pelvic Tilt?

We know that in APT, the hip flexors and lower back are over-active, and the glutes and abs are weak.

But what about the adductors? Are they over-active or weak? If you’re in anterior pelvic tilt, should you focus on strengthening the adductors, or foam rolling and stretching them?

Adductors are considered part of the posterior chain (aren’t they?) so I’d be inclined to say they should be strengthened, but I’m not sure. What do you think?

Adductors will be tight. However, stretching them will only provide temporary relief. We know the root cause of the problem for APT is (as you stated) weak glutes and lower abs. So strengthen the glutes and lower abs on a daily basis.

Oysters x 20 (Or side lying leg raise depending on your med glute strength. Focus on squeezing the glute med as hard as you can and the legs should abduct, don’t just lift your leg a bunch of times). This will help release you adductors, stretching them in between sets will do some good.

Glute Bridge x 10 - Slow tempo. Squeeze the glutes as hard as you can at the top. Do the hips get to neutral?

Leg lowers x 15 - slight bend in the knees, keep lower back flat. As you descend the lower back will want to round off the floor, stop just before that point and pull the hips back using the lower abs only. This should not be felt in the hip flexors.

This is a start. Avoid deadlifts and squats. Do try back extension (use glutes), stepup variations, leg curls, side lying crunches/leg lifts…the list can go on. PM if you want additional help.

[quote]EricDowling wrote:
Adductors will be tight. However, stretching them will only provide temporary relief. We know the root cause of the problem for APT is (as you stated) weak glutes and lower abs. So strengthen the glutes and lower abs on a daily basis.

Oysters x 20 (Or side lying leg raise depending on your med glute strength. Focus on squeezing the glute med as hard as you can and the legs should abduct, don’t just lift your leg a bunch of times). This will help release you adductors, stretching them in between sets will do some good.

Glute Bridge x 10 - Slow tempo. Squeeze the glutes as hard as you can at the top. Do the hips get to neutral?

Leg lowers x 15 - slight bend in the knees, keep lower back flat. As you descend the lower back will want to round off the floor, stop just before that point and pull the hips back using the lower abs only. This should not be felt in the hip flexors.

This is a start. Avoid deadlifts and squats. Do try back extension (use glutes), stepup variations, leg curls, side lying crunches/leg lifts…the list can go on. PM if you want additional help. [/quote]

Cheers. Don’t deadlift or squat though? I thought deadlifts were one of the best exercises to correct anterior pelvic tilt because of their focus on the posterior chain?

the don’t deadlift or squat advice is good if your ATP means those movements cause you pain.

If you can do those lifts without discomfort, then yes you absolutely should be doing them.

the list of exercises Eric gave you is good, do those every day.