T Nation

Adding Satty Fat

Okay so although I’m eating 80g of fat on normal carb days I want a higher percentage of this to be cholesterol containing animal saturated fat. I do get some saturated fat from eggs and coconut oil but not a whole lot from the rest of my diet like my chicken breast and salmon.

I have my caloric intake and macros down I really dont want to play with adjusting macros to an extreme and I like to eat the same every day I’m used to buying certain things and spending a certain amount of money so I’d rather not go the most obvious route (red meat)

So what about the grass fed butter they sell at walmart. Would this be just as good as any for adding animal sourced saturated fat into my diet?

Any other good sources of cholesterol containing saturated animal fat foods I can add?

[quote]paulieserafini wrote:
Okay so although I’m eating 80g of fat on normal carb days I want a higher percentage of this to be cholesterol containing animal saturated fat. I do get some saturated fat from eggs and coconut oil but not a whole lot from the rest of my diet like my chicken breast and salmon.

I have my caloric intake and macros down I really dont want to play with adjusting macros to an extreme and I like to eat the same every day I’m used to buying certain things and spending a certain amount of money so I’d rather not go the most obvious route (red meat)

So what about the grass fed butter they sell at walmart. Would this be just as good as any for adding animal sourced saturated fat into my diet?

Any other good sources of cholesterol containing saturated animal fat foods I can add?[/quote]

I drink whole cream. It’s pretty easy to add to other things like coffee or sauces - I even drink it straight.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]paulieserafini wrote:
So what about the grass fed butter they sell at walmart. Would this be just as good as any for adding animal sourced saturated fat into my diet?

Any other good sources of cholesterol containing saturated animal fat foods I can add?[/quote]

I drink whole cream. It’s pretty easy to add to other things like coffee or sauces - I even drink it straight.[/quote]

x2. Whole cream and/or half & half. Drink it straight if you want, or mix it into shakes like I do.

Also, if you can find beef tallow – or you know how to render it yourself from beef suet (which can be found at some walmart grocery stores, especially ones that have a higher mexican population) – you can use that for cooking. It’s pretty high in sat fat.

In addition to the above suggestions – start cooking your food with pork lard instead of vegetable oil (it’s often available in grocery stores, even Wal-mart, just ask the butcher/meat section folks if you can’t spot it right off the bat).

Not only will you up your sat fat intake, but everything will taste freaking incredible, even better than cooking everything in butter.

Great ideas guys I never would have thought of those.

Do you think any one would be superior over the other. For instance butter with milk made from grassfed beef sounds like it would be a healthier option.

or maybe organic whipping cream.

[quote]paulieserafini wrote:
Great ideas guys I never would have thought of those.

Do you think any one would be superior over the other. For instance butter with milk made from grassfed beef sounds like it would be a healthier option.

or maybe organic whipping cream. [/quote]

John Meadows highly recommends Kerrygold butter, its an Irish butter made with milk from grass-fed cows. From what i’ve heard its pretty good stuff but i’ve yet to make my way to Trader Joes to pick some up yet.

[quote]Eazy wrote:

[quote]paulieserafini wrote:
Great ideas guys I never would have thought of those.

Do you think any one would be superior over the other. For instance butter with milk made from grassfed beef sounds like it would be a healthier option.

or maybe organic whipping cream. [/quote]

John Meadows highly recommends Kerrygold butter, its an Irish butter made with milk from grass-fed cows. From what i’ve heard its pretty good stuff but i’ve yet to make my way to Trader Joes to pick some up yet.
[/quote]

This is the one I am talking about. If Meadows reccomends it, it’s gotta make me swolle

Pfft. Butter has all those milk solids getting in the way of maximum sat fat consumption.

I’m not aware of much of a grass-fed pork market…so skip that, get grass-fed lamb fat from a butcher shop.

Fry some garlic in that stuff and it would make anything edible.

You’d get all Paul Prudhomme-type swole.

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:
Pfft. Butter has all those milk solids getting in the way of maximum sat fat consumption.

I’m not aware of much of a grass-fed pork market…so skip that, get grass-fed lamb fat from a butcher shop.

Fry some garlic in that stuff and it would make anything edible.

You’d get all Paul Prudhomme-type swole.

[/quote]

milk solids prevent sat fat absorbtion?

yea try grass fed raw butter, raw milk or the vat pasteurized grass fed milk, sour cream or any grass fed dairy product pretty much. you can also purchase straight up mct oil if you wanted.

[quote]paulieserafini wrote:
Great ideas guys I never would have thought of those.

Do you think any one would be superior over the other. For instance butter with milk made from grassfed beef sounds like it would be a healthier option.

or maybe organic whipping cream. [/quote]

I mean, if you are eating organic, I’d assume you want these as well. Takes about 3gal of milk to make a lb of butter, and prob close to make an equivalent amount of cream. Not terribly concentrated stuff, like cheese that’s about 10gal/lb of cheese. If you’re worried about concentrating something in your food source, go organic. If you don’t eat organic now, I wouldn’t worry about it much

[quote]paulieserafini wrote:

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:
Pfft. Butter has all those milk solids getting in the way of maximum sat fat consumption.

I’m not aware of much of a grass-fed pork market…so skip that, get grass-fed lamb fat from a butcher shop.

Fry some garlic in that stuff and it would make anything edible.

You’d get all Paul Prudhomme-type swole.

[/quote]

milk solids prevent sat fat absorbtion?[/quote]

Actually I didn’t mean it like that – I just suggested animal lard vs. butter because

  1. rendered animal fat is really pretty damned close to as much saturated fat you can get per unit volume. I mean, if that’s your concern. Prepared coconut oil might be pretty close, but you mentioned your interest in animal fat sources which is why I didn’t mention coconut oil*.

  2. If this is for cooking, rendered animal fat has a generally higher smoke/burn temperature than butter. A lot of things pan fried in butter just sort of stew and simmer, not really fry. Plus, again, lamb and pork lard makes everything taste really damned good.

But if you’re doing this for a spread or adding to foods in a cold state, butter will probably taste better.

  • But since it’s mentioned now… if you just want saturated fat with a LOT of healthy secondary oils, you might want to give coconut oil a look. Extremely beneficial in a lot of ways, pleasant tasting cold for a spread, fantastic hot as a cooking oil because it doesn’t readily degenerate in heat. Good stuff.

EDIT: Side note…I never know whether to take you 100% seriously because your avatar photo is so damned funny. And that video you put up the other day…lol

add coconut milk to your shakes. It’s delicious

buy a whole coconut, crack it, chop it up, and eat some with every meal. delicious and full of satty fat.

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:

[quote]paulieserafini wrote:

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:
Pfft. Butter has all those milk solids getting in the way of maximum sat fat consumption.

I’m not aware of much of a grass-fed pork market…so skip that, get grass-fed lamb fat from a butcher shop.

Fry some garlic in that stuff and it would make anything edible.

You’d get all Paul Prudhomme-type swole.

[/quote]

milk solids prevent sat fat absorbtion?[/quote]

Actually I didn’t mean it like that – I just suggested animal lard vs. butter because

  1. rendered animal fat is really pretty damned close to as much saturated fat you can get per unit volume. I mean, if that’s your concern. Prepared coconut oil might be pretty close, but you mentioned your interest in animal fat sources which is why I didn’t mention coconut oil*.

  2. If this is for cooking, rendered animal fat has a generally higher smoke/burn temperature than butter. A lot of things pan fried in butter just sort of stew and simmer, not really fry. Plus, again, lamb and pork lard makes everything taste really damned good.

But if you’re doing this for a spread or adding to foods in a cold state, butter will probably taste better.

  • But since it’s mentioned now… if you just want saturated fat with a LOT of healthy secondary oils, you might want to give coconut oil a look. Extremely beneficial in a lot of ways, pleasant tasting cold for a spread, fantastic hot as a cooking oil because it doesn’t readily degenerate in heat. Good stuff.

EDIT: Side note…I never know whether to take you 100% seriously because your avatar photo is so damned funny. And that video you put up the other day…lol[/quote]

Yeah, I agree. The water content of butter makes it less than ideal for frying as is.

It can be clarified into ghee which removes the water and milk solids and makes it more suitable for sauteing. Or just buy ghee premade though the organic stuff is not cheap.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
Yeah, I agree. The water content of butter makes it less than ideal for frying as is.

It can be clarified into ghee which removes the water and milk solids and makes it more suitable for sauteing. Or just buy ghee premade though the organic stuff is not cheap.[/quote]

Or, for the sake of learning how to do it… start with [organic] heavy cream, whip it into butter, then clarify it and save that. If you know how to do it from scratch, you can figure out the time/cost benefit ratio of buying it versus making it.

It’s actually not hard to make butter; it just takes time. Start with heavy cream (or double cream in the UK), mix it with a mixer until the liquids (buttermilk) separate from the solids. Give it a bit more time just to make sure everything’s separated, then fill a bowl with cold water, and squeeze the solid butter in there just to make sure you’ve gotten rid of all the liquids, and rinse it off.

For clarifying butter, you really just warm it up until it separates into the clear part on top, and the milk solids float to the bottom. Then pour off the clear part and save that.

Clarified butter handles a lot higher temperatures than regular butter, and it still provides that butter flavor.

/random shit I know

Original/full-fat greek yogurt is great

NEW QUESTION.

okay so a few of you have been reccomending plant sources of satty fat.

I already take coconut oil (which are very different from saturated fats from animal sources)

the reason I specified animal fat is because it contains cholesterol which no vegetable fats contain.

now I don’t know much about fat and cholesterol so maybe some of you can enlighten me.

Most hormones are created from cholesterol…the biggest one I am concerned about is Testosterone.

I know your body can make cholesterol from fats and carbs can influence what types of cholesterol is made by the liver.

does it matter if you’re intaking any extra dietary cholesterol? Can this help testosterone levels by increasing cholesterol consumption (keeping fat consumption the same, but JUST increasing cholesterol alone)

I cook a lot of bacon and leave the fat in the pan for the next meal. Over a couple of days it gets to a great level for frying. Plus bacon fat is off the fucking hook delicious

Organ meats.
Cheap, tasty, nutritious and fatty.