T Nation

Adding Extra Cals


#1

The good news is that I"ve been able to up my daily calories to just over 4000, which is quite an improvement. However, there's still 1000 more to go!

So quick question: Since I'm already getting 250+ grams of protein per day, how much does it really matter where the rest of my calories come from? See, I could up the total to 5000 Calories (my recommended amount) if I guzzle back more EVOO.

Mind you, doing so would probably push my nutrient ratio out to something like 20% protein, 30% carbs, 50% fat. How significant would that be to my muscle gains?

Would I just get fatter? Does it matter where the calories are coming from as long as I meet the protein and total calorie requirements?

I try to stick as closely to a 30 / 40 / 30 breakdown as possible but as my calorie intake rises, I find that the fat total gets proportionally larger.


#2

I honestly think in trying to cram as many calories as you can, you could only benefit from getting more carbs around your workout. Eat more fruits before, starches, etc., and then in your drink, add more dextrose/malto or whatever you’re using. If you’re not drinking a carb/protein supplement DURING your workout, here’s a good chance to start.


#3

[quote]nz6stringaxe wrote:
I honestly think in trying to cram as many calories as you can, you could only benefit from getting more carbs around your workout. Eat more fruits before, starches, etc., and then in your drink, add more dextrose/malto or whatever you’re using. If you’re not drinking a carb/protein supplement DURING your workout, here’s a good chance to start.[/quote]

I was going to just leave this htread without commenting, but when I hit back, I got a glimpse of your screen name… HOLY SHIT, NICK! I haven’t talked to you in years! Fancy that, you’re a BB now. Never would’ve guessed. I had JUST deleted all of my old contacts from MX, too. Christ.

(And given that it’s been somehwere around 3-4 years… if you do not remember who this is… I own a Les Paul Black Beauty with DiMarzio X2N/PAF Pro/Air Norton set up as the pup config).

As far as on-topic goes… I’ve never been a huge fan of peri-workout nutrition, namely because I find it gives a lot of people GI trouble and my own clients tend to puke a lot. The most important nutrition is PWO, and I think that’s when the vast majority of the calories should be coming in.

Other than that, breakfast is key. These two spots also happen to be the time periods where your carb intake can be quite a bit higher, so it’s not uncommon for my breakfast macro profile to be something like 50% carbs, 40% protein, 10% fat. Towards the end of the night, I tend to have a much higher fat intake and a much lower carb intake… but experiment a little.

I wouldn’t worry too much about ingesting too much fat IF IT WORKS FOR YOU (that’s an important point). I’ve known guys who consume 60% fat during bulking phases and are lean as hell. The important thing is to make sure that your baseline nutrition is top-notch.

If you’re getting everything you should be getting in, whatever else you add onto it isn’t really going to affect you that much. Hell, I just stuffed my face with Oreos and I am NOT a hard gainer. The important thing is to pay attention to your body and see what works. Maybe having 2-4 Oreos with your meals will make you put on more fat than you want… if it does, just stop.

the difference between a beginner and an intermediate/expert is that the intermediates and experts out there have experimented enough to know what their bodies can and can’t handle… or if they haven’t, they aren’t AFRAID to experiment to learn more.

In my experience, and with my clients, I don’t really recommend eating whatever you can… BUT… if you’re eating clean, and getting everything you need, what you add in calories isn’t going to be that bad for you, no matter what it is.


#4

Quick question Hank, where did you get the recommended calories from? And is the “250” your current bodyweight? Seems to me if you have just upped your cals to over 4000 recently, I’d keep it there and see how you respond first.

Alot of people use calories that high or higher, but I find that I myself still gain weight with even 3500 cals at ~250 with weight training 3-4 days a week, morning cardio and a semi-physical job (on my feet anyway, not super demanding. So it’s all pretty individual just keep that in mind.


#5

[quote]JMAX wrote:
Quick question Hank, where did you get the recommended calories from? And is the “250” your current bodyweight? Seems to me if you have just upped your cals to over 4000 recently, I’d keep it there and see how you respond first.

Alot of people use calories that high or higher, but I find that I myself still gain weight with even 3500 cals at ~250 with weight training 3-4 days a week, morning cardio and a semi-physical job (on my feet anyway, not super demanding. So it’s all pretty individual just keep that in mind.[/quote]

I got the 5000 Cal figure from an article linked in the “Are you a beginnner 2” article. The 250 is my current protein intake in grams. My body weight is 210 currently, at 6’3".

You know, I"m almost jealous to hear about your success at 3500 Cal! I was in the 3000 area my whole life, was never hungry but never went anywhere weight / performance wise. When I was finally able to control my diet and eat a 30/40/30 split at that calorie level, my workouts were still stagnant.

Now around the 4000 level, I"m upping the weights almost each week which is great, but it’s hard to see any growth except on the scale.


#6

[quote]animus wrote:

I wouldn’t worry too much about ingesting too much fat IF IT WORKS FOR YOU (that’s an important point). I’ve known guys who consume 60% fat during bulking phases and are lean as hell. The important thing is to make sure that your baseline nutrition is top-notch.
[/quote]

Wow! 60% from fat and still doing alright. THAT is encouraging.