T Nation

Addicted to Weight Lifting

I’m sure nearly everyone on this board is addicted to weight lifting (what with the endorphins and all). As for me, I don’t like waiting for my next workout, and I sometimes work out on recovery days.

Who on this board works out nearly every day, and what do you think of doing this? Do you notice any negative effects, like stagnating muscle growth, etc.?

I used to work out every day. I found that doing so did cause my progression to slow dramatically.

I’m an addict.

yes being addicted to something that benefits your mind and body is definitely a problem

there’s another word for “obsessed”, dedicated

everyone in western society would do themselves a favor by being way more selfish with their body instead of trying to be everything to everyone while letting their health deteriorate to shit

Working out is a relative term. I ‘workout’ six days a week, but that doesnt mean I weightlift six days a week. 4 days dedicated to weightlifting, and two days to GPP/cardio.

I’m an addict too. I sometimes forget about my life outside of it and that’s when I consider myself more addicted than dedicated. But it does keep me healthy.

[quote]Bwick wrote:
I’m sure nearly everyone on this board is addicted to weight lifting (what with the endorphins and all). As for me, I don’t like waiting for my next workout, and I sometimes work out on recovery days.

Who on this board works out nearly every day, and what do you think of doing this? Do you notice any negative effects, like stagnating muscle growth, etc.?[/quote]

Sometimes I may lift 7 days a week.

Those times I do I throw in a cycle of force-feeding (which I stopped doing regularly because I can fit 5000 or so calories in me easily now). Carbs are very UNDERrated. Eat more carbs when you lift on recovery days, and keep protein high.

For example, last week I did my usual Back and Biceps on Monday. Wednesday is usually my off/cardio day but I was bored so I went ahead and did Back/Bis again even though they were sore (I didn’t want to conflict with any other body part and Chest/Tris were way too sore).

Although sore, I kept my carbs and protein high and they were fine. They probably benefited from it.

I used to b like that but not anymore…I dont dislike weightlifting and I still do it but i dont necisarilly enjoy it anymore,what i do enjoy is after the workout you feel good about yourself

A lot on here are addicted to reading about weightlifting, judging form the number of posts and the performance numbers.

I feel like crap on days that i don’t do some physical exercise.
Yesterday i did 364 incline pushups over 10 sets, just to keep in shape until my gym is open again. I’d say i’m addicted.

There’s nothing wrong with being addicted to physical activity; it improves mood, memory, and can help many emotional disorders such as stress, anxiety, depression, etc.

However, to get the full benefit out of physical activity it is best to do some sort of intense cardio or something that requires a lot of coordination, like racketball or tennis.

I try to run intensely on the treadmill a couple of times a week.

Twice a day, five days a week.

Weekends some sprinting and dragging.

Well, before I got glandular fever. Had about a month off all training and will soon start easing my way back in.

The twice a day training is pretty easy for me. I drive past my gym going too and from work every weekday. 15 to 20 minutes in the morning and 20 to 30 minutes at night.

Used to do judo and kickboxing a couple of nights a week after that too, but at 40 and with a very physically demanding job I had trouble keeping up like I used to.

Every now and then I drop back to two or three longer sessions a week for a month to break things up.

I do far better on these shorter more frequent sessions and I’m less fried afterwards. Maybe it’s to do with my age or something, but I find hard workouts longer than 45 minutes take days to recover from, whereas the short intense ones I’m feeling great from the moment I walk out the gym door till I get under the iron for the next workout.

Whenever I see an infomercial for diet stuff, or that p-90x thing I have to watch, because for the most part it’s like watching a train wreak. It’s not just lifting that fascinates me, it’s the lifestyle.

[quote]cyph31 wrote:
yes being addicted to something that benefits your mind and body is definitely a problem

there’s another word for “obsessed”, dedicated

everyone in western society would do themselves a favor by being way more selfish with their body instead of trying to be everything to everyone while letting their health deteriorate to shit[/quote]

Actually, there are many synonyms for “obsessed”. Haunted, controlled, dominated, tormented, overpowered, troubled and plagued are a few.

There is a big difference between really liking weight lifting, wanting to be healthy, or strong and being obsessed or addicted. The latter is neither healthy nor beneficial.

I lift 4 days a week and I actually enjoy my days off just as much as my lifting days (well, almost). Lifting + nutrition is on my mind every day though but I don’t think that makes me obsessed/addicted… or does it if I prefer lifting to “going out”?

[quote]elano wrote:
I’m an addict.[/quote]

I’m clapping right now, and if we were in a circle I’d hug you

I think that in the same way you as a bodybuilder enjoy looking forward to 8 quality hours of sack time, you should look at maybe 2 days a week off of training.

Anyone who wants to truly excel at what they do has to be really dedicated.

People who are happy with living mediocre lives look at dedicated people and say “obsessed”.

Some people just don’t know what it’s like to have goals and do everything you can to achieve them. I would hate it if I wasn’t dedicated to something and didn’t have goals.

I have an Knee injury right now, and havent been squatting for the last month and a half. Working out 2 days a week is killing me, im an addict.