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Add 200 Pounds to Squat in 10 Wks?

I read off this article at www.trulyhuge.com/news/tips62d.htm that the person added nearly 200 lbs to their squat in 10 weeks. Bullshit or doable? Perhaps his beginner status allowed him to increase his strength quickly, but is such low volume/practice really practical to a lifter like me?

I’m thinking about trying it out, I currently back squat 200x5 and front squat 180 for 5.

Thoughts?

its doable, cuz i put 80 lbs on my bench.
and 90 on my squat in less time, its all your form.

What was the guys squat before? If it was 135lb squat, going to 335 is very doable. But, if he had a 300lb squat and hit 500 in 10 weeks, possible, but not plausible. And, going from 400 to 600 in two weeks. I would hate to say it, but he would have to have a really good pharmacist (I hate being judgemental).

[quote]undesired08 wrote:
What was the guys squat before? If it was 135lb squat, going to 335 is very doable. But, if he had a 300lb squat and hit 500 in 10 weeks, possible, but not plausible. And, going from 400 to 600 in two weeks. I would hate to say it, but he would have to have a really good pharmacist (I hate being judgemental).[/quote]

It says he want from 175-375 in the link.

[quote]Bloobird wrote:
undesired08 wrote:
What was the guys squat before? If it was 135lb squat, going to 335 is very doable. But, if he had a 300lb squat and hit 500 in 10 weeks, possible, but not plausible. And, going from 400 to 600 in two weeks. I would hate to say it, but he would have to have a really good pharmacist (I hate being judgemental).

It says he want from 175-375 in the link.[/quote]

That is very likely with a little guidance from someone with experience, switching from high-bar to low bar, and getting the time under the bar. A lot of people that can’t squat over 315 are just “put off” by the discomfort of holding the weight, I know that I was the first time I did half squats with 405.

It could happen, it just depends.

I think it said he went from 175x8 to 375x4. That’s quite an improvement.

And thats just by doing one set of 5 reps and adding 20lbs each week. That’s pretty agressive. One set of Squats, Deads, Pullups and Dips each week and nothing else. Almost sounds too good to be true. This is almost as easy as taking a magic pill and not even having to lift.

If you are a lousy Squatter, then I don’t think it’s enough reps to just get good at Squatting. And if your technique is already solid, I don’t really think it’s enough stimulus to justify those kind of gains.

If someone could take my front squat from 112.5 kg and pimp it by less than 100 pounds - to 150 kg - in the same time frame, I’d be ecstatic.

So if the link isn’t clickable no one goes to the site?

LMAO, i never even saw the link. And, no. It takes too much effort to copy and paste.

[quote]G87 wrote:
If someone could take my front squat from 112.5 kg and pimp it by less than 100 pounds - to 150 kg - in the same time frame, I’d be ecstatic. [/quote]

Smolov

feel free to pay me anything after your squat goes through the roof. I accept paypal.

[quote]Invictica wrote:
G87 wrote:
If someone could take my front squat from 112.5 kg and pimp it by less than 100 pounds - to 150 kg - in the same time frame, I’d be ecstatic.

Smolov

feel free to pay me anything after your squat goes through the roof. I accept paypal.[/quote]

I dunno how useful smolov would be here. Unless you’re very light 112.5 kg seems like novice weight and you probably don’t have the work capacity to justify using smolov so soon.

I’m not saying it won’t yield results, but any 5x5 or say 8x3 progression for 10-12 weeks can get the novice average weight lifter to a 150 kg front squat just as effectively.

Obviously, form and mobility have to be in place first so I’m using the term “novice” instead of “beginner” just to clarify.

[quote]limitatinfinity wrote:
Invictica wrote:
G87 wrote:
If someone could take my front squat from 112.5 kg and pimp it by less than 100 pounds - to 150 kg - in the same time frame, I’d be ecstatic.

Smolov

feel free to pay me anything after your squat goes through the roof. I accept paypal.

I dunno how useful smolov would be here. Unless you’re very light 112.5 kg seems like novice weight and you probably don’t have the work capacity to justify using smolov so soon.

I’m not saying it won’t yield results, but any 5x5 or say 8x3 progression for 10-12 weeks can get the novice average weight lifter to a 150 kg front squat just as effectively.

Obviously, form and mobility have to be in place first so I’m using the term “novice” instead of “beginner” just to clarify.[/quote]

I know you mean well…

But you didn’t get the inside joke. lulz

Whoops. here is the article:

Increase Your Squat

How to add 120 pounds to your squat lift within the next 6 weeks
by Oliver Wolter

Today I want to introduce to you one of the simplest, shortest but most
valuable strength producing workout routines. Probably it’s my usual
German spleen but I love short result producing workout routines.

It’s like I always design workout routines. Selecting the target - aiming

  • shooting and get out of it. I know it’s probably not anybody’s taste of
    workout routine, because it’s not much training. But I don’t care, because
    I call my style results orientated training. It doesn’t need to be
    entertaining, it doesn’t need to look cool - all it is for results.

But the results have to be more than cool - this is what I care about.

This workout routine is not about building up huge muscle mass it’s about
getting strong in the basic movements ASAP.

This Super Squat workout routine contains of only 4 basic exercises:

  1. Squats
  2. Deadlift
  3. Pull Ups
  4. Chest Dip

That’s all!

You have to do one set of each exercise - nothing more - only one short
set. Remember I am talking about putting on strength not putting on muscle
mass.

Do at least 5 repetitions of each exercise and a maximum of 12. But now
comes the little trick. Increase your weight as long as you don’t drop
below 5 reps.

Don’t care about increasing reps - care about increasing weights - because
you want to gain strength.

If you want to go wild like a few of my clients - increase the weight for
lower body movements (Squat and Deathlift) 20 pounds and for upper body
movements (Pull Ups and Chest Dip) 10 pounds with each workout.

Hmmm…probably you are not that crazy but try at least 10 pounds lower
body and 5 pounds upper body. This should work fine for most people.

Again - if your reps drop below 5 - don’t increase the weight - as long as
you stay at 5 reps or above - increase the weight.

Don’t overdo it when you start with your first workout. Start with a weight
you could normally use for 10-12 reps.

One question is still open - How many workouts you should do?
ONE SET FOR EACH EXERCISE
ONE WORKOUT EACH WEEK - THAT’S ALL

But I want to give you two example workouts:

WORKOUT NUMBER 1

  1. Squats - 220 pounds - 10 reps
    90 seconds rest
  2. Deadlift - 240 pounds - 11 reps
    90 seconds rest
  3. Pull Ups - (bodyweight 180 lbs + 5 lbs plate) = 185 pounds - 8 reps
    90 seconds rest
  4. Chest Dip (bodyweight 180 lbs + 10 lbs plate) = 190 pounds - 10 reps
    END OF WORKOUT NUMBER 1

1 WEEK REST

WORKOUT NUMBER 2

  1. Squats - 230 pounds - 10 reps
    90 seconds rest
  2. Deadlift - 250 pounds - 10 reps
    90 seconds rest
  3. Pull Ups - (bodyweight 180 lbs + 10 lbs plate) = 190 pounds - 7 reps
    90 seconds rest
  4. Chest Dip (bodyweight 180 lbs + 15 lbs plate) = 195 pounds - 10 reps
    END OF WORKOUT NUMBER 2

If you didn’t understand it the first time -read it again.
ONE SET OF EACH EXERCISE - ONE WORKOUT EACH WEEK
INCREASE THE WEIGHT WHILE YOU DON’T DROP BELOW 5 REPS.

Sounds to simple to work?

Well I know - a lot of people said this to me about 2 years ago me. So I
made one public test back between 12/02/00 and 01/24/01. This test lasted
about 10 weeks.

Christian the test person was somebody you would call a hard gainer. But
he was extremely motivated, this was the reason I decided he should be the
test person. I wanted to show that you don’t have to be a genetic wonder
to achieve great gains as long as you do your best to succeed.

Christian did only 10 workouts in 10 weeks. Here are the results:

Start (12/02/00):

  1. Squats - 8 reps with 80 kg (176.37 lbs)
  2. Deadlift - 5 reps with 60kg (132.28 lbs)
  3. Pull Ups - 5 reps - Bodyweight + 5kg (11.02 lbs)
  4. Chest Dips - 5 reps Bodyweight only

End (01/24/01)

  1. Squats - 4 reps with 170 kg (374.8 lbs)
  2. Deadlift - 4 reps with 110kg (242.5 lbs)
  3. Pull Ups - 6 reps Bodyweight + 20kg (44.09 lbs)
  4. Chest Dips - 4 reps - Bodyweight + 20kg (44.09 lbs)

This means he increased his strength by:

Squats + 90 kg (198.41 lbs)
Deadlift + 50 kg (110.23 lbs)
Pull Ups + 15 kg (33.07 lbs)
Chest Dips + 20 kg (44.09 lbs)

Not bad for a so called hard gainer within 10 weeks of training?!

After this a lot of people tried the same workout routine. And guess what

  • they had similar results.

You can do this too - or have even better results - but you have to be
motivated.

Well this is what I call results based bodybuilding - set your aim -
follow it and achieve it. The training wasn’t fancy or exotic - but it
did it’s job.

And the results were better than what a lot of people with ordinary workout
routines will ever achieve in a lifetime.

I always use short training routines. They don’t have to be this short but
they only have to fulfill what they are for.

In my personal training software X-Size I also
use short routines but in a more advanced way. I created this
software to make something completely different. It’s all about timing.

Such short routines could be confusing if you add some advanced
techniques like upgrading exhaustion or advanced splitting. But for this
reason I created my personal training software to keep all guesswork
away from you.

You see the workout routine above is completely easy to understand. But
what happens after a few weeks? You can use this routine only a few weeks
before you hit a plateau. But in X-Size I shoot
for the middle to long term goals. For example I use a similar but more
advanced routine in a feedback controlled manner to shoot for a middle term
goal. What does it mean? I use for example such a routine to initialize your
body for a special muscle mass phase.

Sounds complicated?! It is complicated - but what makes any routine a
real winner is when you can easily follow it. If you have no guesswork. So
this could only be solved with a software that gives you the exact
weights and reps for any workout unit.

Results is all that count!

There’s a lot of things fishy about this, but this is quite possible with a lot of muscle memory involved I guess.

Also, this dude put 200 pounds on his squat (including strengthening his back enough to unrack a weight 200 pounds heavier than his max… but he can only deadlift 110 kg X 4?

There’s a lot of things fishy about this, but this is quite possible with a lot of muscle memory involved I guess.

Also, this dude put 200 pounds on his squat (including strengthening his back enough to unrack a weight 200 pounds heavier than his max… but he can only deadlift 110 kg X 4?

Well, something smells a little fishy to me. Who the heck has a 4RM squat that’s 130lbs higher than his 4RM deadlift. My guess it that the test subject didn’t actually add 200lbs to his squat. He probably shortened his ROM enough to quarter squat an additional 200lbs.

Forgive me for being sceptical, but how can you trust a guy who can’t even count out 10 weeks correctly. The start date of the training program was 12-02-00, and the end date 01-24-01. That’s 53 days, or a little under 8 weeks.

Have you ever tried wave loading?

Alwyn Cosgrove uses it a lot with his very well trained clients, and I’ve made some incredible strength gains by utilizing it.

This is what a wave loading set looks like:

Set 1: 6 reps, however much you think you normally lift at the beginning of a workout.
Set 2: 1 rep, as much weight as you can lift
Set 3: 6 reps, which is more than you were able to lift on the first 6.
Set 4: 1 rep, again shooting for your 1RM. You may be able to exceed your previous 1RM in set 2.
Set 5: 8-10 reps with as much weight as you can handle.

Basically, the 1 rep sets in the middle trick your brain, so to speak. When you lift that one, very heavy rep, your CNS remembers how heavy it is, and upon being loaded with a lower weight in set 3 and 5, your CNS allows you to lift more.

I’m currently in between classes so I don’t have my lifting log with me, but when I was bulking a few months ago, my squat wave loading looked a bit like this:

Set 1: 6 reps, 185 lbs.
Set 2: 1 rep, 245 lbs.
Set 3: 6 reps, 205 lbs.
Set 4: 1 rep, 255 lbs.
Set 5: ~8 reps, 225 lbs.

Believe me, I was pushing myself hard, and I know that there’s no way I could start that off with 225 lbs. I made massive gains despite having done thousands of squats before.

And hey, like I said, it’s got the Alwyn Cosgrove seal of approval, so that’s enough for me. =P

"Christian did only 10 workouts in 10 weeks. Here are the results:

Start (12/02/00):

  1. Squats - 8 reps with 80 kg (176.37 lbs)
  2. Deadlift - 5 reps with 60kg (132.28 lbs)

End (01/24/01)

  1. Squats - 4 reps with 170 kg (374.8 lbs)
  2. Deadlift - 4 reps with 110kg (242.5 lbs)"

Here now… Anyone can add 120lb to their squat if they go from oly squats to high squats.

[quote]ctschneider wrote:
Well, something smells a little fishy to me. Who the heck has a 4RM squat that’s 130lbs higher than his 4RM deadlift. My guess it that the test subject didn’t actually add 200lbs to his squat. He probably shortened his ROM enough to quarter squat an additional 200lbs.

Forgive me for being sceptical, but how can you trust a guy who can’t even count out 10 weeks correctly. The start date of the training program was 12-02-00, and the end date 01-24-01. That’s 53 days, or a little under 8 weeks.[/quote]

x2, exactly.

Check out this new program I’ve been working on:

How to Add 500lbs to Your Bench in One Year.

It’s pretty simple, but sometimes the simplest programs are the most effective.

You must already know your 1 rep max. Don’t guess, and don’t use one of those calculators. Go into the gym and establish your max. Once you have a baseline you are ready to start.

Each week you will go into the gym and break your old PR by 10lbs. Just one set of 1 rep, nothing else. Keep breaking your max each week for 52 weeks. At the end of the program you will have added at least 500lbs to you previous max.

If you have any questions or want the full program in writing, just send me $49.99 by paypal and I’ll set you up for the year.