T Nation

Active Release/ Massage

Anybody ever have Active Release Technique done on them? Did it have any effect on performance?
Same question for a standard sports massage.

I’ve had ART. Fantastic procedure IF adhesions are the problem and your practitioner is competent. I had a lot of crap built up from a lot of distance running in high school, so it helped my calves and hamstrings a lot.

-Dan

Any suggestions on how to find a good practitioner? Anyone know one in DC?

Also, how much does it hurt? I’ve been rolfed, so my pain meter goes up to 11, but I like to know in advance.

thanks

I’ve had issues with my hip flexors for a while. Stretching and glute-activation did quite a bit to help, but after just one session of work on them by the massage therapist they felt better than they have in years. I was skeptical, but this stuff is legit.

How much does ART cost per session? You can find a practitioner from their website. What have people paid and how many sessions are generally needed. (I know it will vary form person to person, just trying to get a ballpark figure)

The stuff has never done a thing for me. If not for so many extolling its virtues, I’d be sure it was quackery.

[quote]marza wrote:
Any suggestions on how to find a good practitioner? Anyone know one in DC?

Also, how much does it hurt? I’ve been rolfed, so my pain meter goes up to 11, but I like to know in advance.

thanks[/quote]

Dr Steven Horwitz. www.youcanbefit.com

He’s a former competitive bodybuilder and powerlifter, and has done work on me with ART and Graston Technique. Did wonders for my elbow which has had problems ever since I broke it when I was a child.

And yes, it hurts like a mofo, but it’s so short, anybody ought to be able to grit their teeth through it.

An ART practitioner restored both my shoulder and wrist to pre-injury health. When I re-injured said shoulder in a different way, he was unable to fix it. For the most part, though, my experience with ART has been very positive.

I found a GREAT guy in NJ. Who’s extremely legit. Yes it works after your first session in most cases, did for me and I discussed how many others are the same with my practicioner. He said most. If you had surgery expect too much scar tissue to really be able to do that much with. Otherwise from regular wear a tear and just beating the piss out of yourself it works very very well. I was 110% after 3 sessions. I could not believe how fucked up I actually was until it gained back my ROM! I have no insurance so it ran me $50 a pop wich imo sucks balls but I still pay to go like once every month or so wich is about all I need. BTW, imo you can keep your visits down by doing alot of work on yourself with a foam roller, band work like in Tate’s Band Man article, and stretching/yoga. BTW, it’s not that painful.

Works great for me. You can get on ART’s national website and do a search, or probably just google it. Here a session costs $50-$60, but my insurance covers it, I make a $20 copay and am allowed around 30 visits a year, but I don’t use them. I only go as needed, 2-3 treatments is the most I’ve gone in a row.

I will agree with what some have said above, not everyone responds well. Out of 8-9 people I’ve referred to ART, 2 got absolutely nothing from it.

[quote]skizac wrote:
marza wrote:
Any suggestions on how to find a good practitioner? Anyone know one in DC?

Also, how much does it hurt? I’ve been rolfed, so my pain meter goes up to 11, but I like to know in advance.

Dr Steven Horwitz. www.youcanbefit.com

He’s a former competitive bodybuilder and powerlifter, and has done work on me with ART and Graston Technique. Did wonders for my elbow which has had problems ever since I broke it when I was a child.

And yes, it hurts like a mofo, but it’s so short, anybody ought to be able to grit their teeth through it.[/quote]

Thanks. I had a treatment w/ him today. I don’t have any major issues, but I thought it would be interesting to get a shoulder that has had some on again/off again problems looked at. Not too painful, but that may be a reflection of the fact that there isn’t too much damage in the area, or it may mean that he hasn’t really started on the sore spots.

I like the idea of “we treat you and then we’re done w/ you.” So often chiropractic seems to end up as a lifetime of adjustments and I don’t see that being the case here.

He did look at me kind of funny when I mentioned some issues I was having w/ OHSing. I forget that most people don’t do that.

Thanks for the recommendation.

Martha