T Nation

Accumulation and OL

CT,
Your recent push toward more OL movements influenced me so now I am training for my a masters Weightlifting meet. Most legit Weightlifting protocols (including the ones you posted here recently) include 3-7+ sessions per week lifting 10-20 lifts at 85%+, more or less.

For a master (40+) lifter trying to work up the recovery capacity to handle all the heavy lifts, is it better to start with:
A. Heavy weights, High Frequency, and slowly build up volume per session (1-2 lifts above 85% per session, going to 10-20 lifts)
B. High Frequency w Moderate Volume, and slowly build up weight (3-4x per week do 10-20 lifts at 60-70% going to 85-95%)
C. Heavy Weights with Volume, and build up from 1 session per week to 3-4 sessions per week, with lighter weights (or volume) on the other days.

Right now I am doing more of B, and seeing progress in physique and “perceived exertion.” I am definitely limited by my recovery right now - mostly CNS and joints, not muscles. When I am not recovered, I tend to go lighter, but do more of the planned sets/reps, versus go for one heavy set and then stop. My concern is that I am doing more “conditioning” than strength training.

Thoughts?

  1. The most important is to drill technique. I just got back to the olympic lifts after about 10 years without doing them. And when I did them I was very strong but had below average (for an olympic lifter) technique. Now, I did some power snatching from blocks over the past 3-4 years but no clean at all in 10 years and certainly no full snatched.

When I decided to get back to the olympic lifts (and probably compete again) I decided to drop my ego and drill perfect technique. This means frequent practice of the lifts, with light/moderate weights (60-70%) at a fairly high volume. To me that was highly beneficial because over the past 3 years I re=learned the proper way to do the olympic lifts. Now that my technique is pretty solid I can begin to load more.

  1. For a person with lesser recovery capacities I think that the best approach is to use an undulating loading during the week. For example:

DAY 1. High volume (110-120 total reps including assistance work) of moderate loading (70-80%) with emphasis on the full competition lifts (about 9 reps per competitive lift at 80%)

DAY 2. Low volume (50-60 total repetitions including assistance work) of light/moderate loading (60-70%) on the power variations of the lifts

DAY 3. Moderate volume (80-100 total reps including assistance work) of moderate/high loading (80-90%) with emphasis on the full lifts. (about 6-8 reps above 80%)

DAY 4. No lifting… some jumping, abs work, mobility, restorative work like massages, ice baths, etc.

DAY 5. Low volume (50-60 total repetitions including assistance work) of light/moderate loading (60-70%) on the power variations of the lifts

DAY 6. High volume (110-120 total reps including assistance work) of moderate loading (70-80%) with emphasis on the full competition lifts (about 9 reps per competitive lift at 80%)

DAY 7. No lifting… some jumping, abs work, mobility, restorative work like massages, ice baths, etc.

The reps per day include all the “work lifting” being done. This means that you count the reps on all exercises, not just the competition lifts. The rep count doesn’t include anything under 60%.

  1. I’m technically a “master” too (it’s 35 in Canada) and I can attest that I do not recover as fast as when I was younger, which is why I focus A LOT on perfectring peri-workout nutrition… I never miss a PLAZMA dose or MAG-10 pulse.

Pure gold. Thank you!!!

CT,
For your accessory work, how much is “fast” lifts (SGHP, PushPress, Wt’d Jumps) versus “slow” lifts (Squat, FS, RDL, Standing Press, etc.)?

I can do 30-40 high quality reps with the classic lifts at 75%+, then I need to move on to less technical lifts. Recently I’ve picked accessories “by feel” based on what limiting my classic lifts that workout. Curious how much you and your athletes vary this stuff (vs pre-programmed) and whether there is any guidance on minimums (such as, Squat X times/wk, or one fast accessory every day, etc.)

I know this question is vague - not asking for you to write out a program. Just looking for your thought process on how to balance out exercise selection “specific to weaknesses” versus “maintaining/developing strengths” and building “strength” versus building “power.”

If this question sucks, gimme a one word answer and I’ll ask a different way. Thanks!!

[quote]orcrist wrote:
CT,
For your accessory work, how much is “fast” lifts (SGHP, PushPress, Wt’d Jumps) versus “slow” lifts (Squat, FS, RDL, Standing Press, etc.)?

I can do 30-40 high quality reps with the classic lifts at 75%+, then I need to move on to less technical lifts. Recently I’ve picked accessories “by feel” based on what limiting my classic lifts that workout. Curious how much you and your athletes vary this stuff (vs pre-programmed) and whether there is any guidance on minimums (such as, Squat X times/wk, or one fast accessory every day, etc.)

I know this question is vague - not asking for you to write out a program. Just looking for your thought process on how to balance out exercise selection “specific to weaknesses” versus “maintaining/developing strengths” and building “strength” versus building “power.”

If this question sucks, gimme a one word answer and I’ll ask a different way. Thanks!![/quote]

Well, it obviously is a matter of your strengths and weaknesses… someone who is stronger than explosive should do more explosive auxiliary work, someone who is more explosive than strong should do the opposite. And I also believe that the older you are, the more you should focus on explosive assistance lifts.