T Nation

Accelerated Classes?

My brother is currently attending his second year of college majoring in English. He realized that though he enjoys it, the job opportunities may not be there when he graduates. So, he has looked into other interesting majors that require a lot of math and/or science courses. Question is, is there any way to take accelerated courses…etc. to catch up or finish faster?

It is not that he can not do the classes but, since he was majoring in English which requires almost no math or science taking every class and its pre/co requisite would take a long time.

Summer school and mini-mesters if offered.

[quote]maverick88 wrote:
My brother is currently attending his second year of college majoring in English. He realized that though he enjoys it, the job opportunities may not be there when he graduates. So, he has looked into other interesting majors that require a lot of math and/or science courses. Question is, is there any way to take accelerated courses…etc. to catch up or finish faster?

It is not that he can not do the classes but, since he was majoring in English which requires almost no math or science taking every class and its pre/co requisite would take a long time.[/quote]

For remedial classes (like anything less than calculus 1), colleges usually have accelerated classes over the summer but if he is lacking in knowledge of algebra and especially trigonometry, which 99.9% of college kids these days are, then he should probably just accept the fact that it will take him some time to get up to the higher level classes. Math classes require a lot of time and practice to learn the material well, so accelerated classes are usually not a good idea.

I was not aware of any “accelerated classes”. People who wanted to finish quicker just took more hours. I knew a number who finished 4 or 5 year degrees in 3 years…but all they literally did was study and take tests. I for one am glad I stuck with the books in college…but I also like the fact that I enjoyed it too.

College is a cool time and basically the last chance you have before the real world slaps you in the face (which won’t be a pretty situation for MANY college students once they realize how their life choices really pay off). It helps to have some really good memories of it instead of just books.

To major in english and then take “biology and math” real fast makes little sense. If anything, do it the other way around.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I was not aware of any “accelerated classes”. People who wanted to finish quicker just took more hours. I knew a number who finished 4 or 5 year degrees in 3 years…but all they literally did was study and take tests. I for one am glad I stuck with the books in college…but I also like the fact that I enjoyed it too.

College is a cool time and basically the last chance you have before the real world slaps you in the face (which won’t be a pretty situation for MANY college students once they realize how their life choices really pay off). It helps to have some really good memories of it instead of just books.

To major in english and then take “biology and math” real fast makes little sense. If anything, do it the other way around.
[/quote]

most colleges offer two 6-8 week summer “semesters” so students can take remedial and pre-req class faster and get to the classes they need. I do not recommend it for students trying to take basic calculus and especially higher mathematics. The algebra, geometry, and trigonometry that you learn in remedial classes are very much needed later on and it is much better to take your time and perfect those skills rather than rushing to get to higher level math classes and then having to catch up.

During my undergrad I had to do this for organic chemistry and French to graduate on time. Organic chemistry was extremely painful to learn in this manner as it involved three hour lectures daily, four hour labs daily, assignments due daily, and an examination every Friday except for two over an eight week period. I also needed to review the material more for later classes as I don’t think the time spent during the accelerated semester was adequate to fully consolidate the information.

French was fine, but I do not recommend taking any hard science with a lab component in this manner.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I was not aware of any “accelerated classes”. People who wanted to finish quicker just took more hours. I knew a number who finished 4 or 5 year degrees in 3 years…but all they literally did was study and take tests. I for one am glad I stuck with the books in college…but I also like the fact that I enjoyed it too.

College is a cool time and basically the last chance you have before the real world slaps you in the face (which won’t be a pretty situation for MANY college students once they realize how their life choices really pay off). It helps to have some really good memories of it instead of just books.

To major in english and then take “biology and math” real fast makes little sense. If anything, do it the other way around.
[/quote]

You can take as many hours as you like when you petition but, you can not take pre-calc and calculus 1 in the same semester. He took the max allowable hours and then petitioned to be allowed to take more but, almost non where math or/science just those required in General Ed. and those for his minor. So, without a way to take move along faster he will essentially be taking just math/science courses for a few years. I have suggested ACT exams and credit by examination but, he will have to study on his own for that and ask his school about any issues.

I finished up Chem II and Calculus over one summer, pretty damn painful and I would not suggest it if you were going to need more courses afterwards. However, knock out social science or general studies through summer or win-ledgers or May-mesters could do the trick. I took 18+ (as much as 23 on semester) and it is possible to do well. Though I will admit it seems the students at the last two colleges I taught at (both respectable) have viewed 15 hours as a heavy load. If your friend can learn well in class (good notes, good memory) then one more course is just three more hours of sitting on your but with some additional studying at times.

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I was not aware of any “accelerated classes”. People who wanted to finish quicker just took more hours. I knew a number who finished 4 or 5 year degrees in 3 years…but all they literally did was study and take tests. I for one am glad I stuck with the books in college…but I also like the fact that I enjoyed it too.

College is a cool time and basically the last chance you have before the real world slaps you in the face (which won’t be a pretty situation for MANY college students once they realize how their life choices really pay off). It helps to have some really good memories of it instead of just books.

To major in english and then take “biology and math” real fast makes little sense. If anything, do it the other way around.
[/quote]

You can take as many hours as you like when you petition but, you can not take pre-calc and calculus 1 in the same semester. He took the max allowable hours and then petitioned to be allowed to take more but, almost non where math or/science just those required in General Ed. and those for his minor. So, without a way to take move along faster he will essentially be taking just math/science courses for a few years. I have suggested ACT exams and credit by examination but, he will have to study on his own for that and ask his school about any issues.
[/quote]

ACT’s are an entrance exam, you don’t get credit for them. And if he is already taking or about to take precalc, then there is nothing he can do to accelerate the process. A standard two to three semester basic calculus sequence is a prerequisite for any higher math and you will not be allowed to take any of those concurrently or on an accelerated basis. Some schools have tried programs like that before and they have all failed miserably. I don’t know of any school these days that does that. The material is way too important to try and rush it. Once you are done with the basic calculus you can take more math classes at the same time (i.e. differential equations, linear algebra, non-euclidian geometry, and most theoretical mathematics classes can be taken concurrently but require a basic calculus sequence to take). Sorry, but your brother should have planned things better.

EDIT: Also, no school worth a damn will give credit by examination for anything above remedial college algebra. I doubt they even have tests for anything higher.

[quote]Dr.Matt581 wrote:

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I was not aware of any “accelerated classes”. People who wanted to finish quicker just took more hours. I knew a number who finished 4 or 5 year degrees in 3 years…but all they literally did was study and take tests. I for one am glad I stuck with the books in college…but I also like the fact that I enjoyed it too.

College is a cool time and basically the last chance you have before the real world slaps you in the face (which won’t be a pretty situation for MANY college students once they realize how their life choices really pay off). It helps to have some really good memories of it instead of just books.

To major in english and then take “biology and math” real fast makes little sense. If anything, do it the other way around.
[/quote]

You can take as many hours as you like when you petition but, you can not take pre-calc and calculus 1 in the same semester. He took the max allowable hours and then petitioned to be allowed to take more but, almost non where math or/science just those required in General Ed. and those for his minor. So, without a way to take move along faster he will essentially be taking just math/science courses for a few years. I have suggested ACT exams and credit by examination but, he will have to study on his own for that and ask his school about any issues.
[/quote]

ACT’s are an entrance exam, you don’t get credit for them. And if he is already taking or about to take precalc, then there is nothing he can do to accelerate the process. A standard two to three semester basic calculus sequence is a prerequisite for any higher math and you will not be allowed to take any of those concurrently or on an accelerated basis. Some schools have tried programs like that before and they have all failed miserably. I don’t know of any school these days that does that. The material is way too important to try and rush it. Once you are done with the basic calculus you can take more math classes at the same time (i.e. differential equations, linear algebra, non-euclidian geometry, and most theoretical mathematics classes can be taken concurrently but require a basic calculus sequence to take). Sorry, but your brother should have planned things better.

EDIT: Also, no school worth a damn will give credit by examination for anything above remedial college algebra. I doubt they even have tests for anything higher.
[/quote]

Based on my ACT and entrance exam I was pegged to start at Calc III. At the sit down orientation with my folks, they looked shocked and I laughed out loud- we all thought they were joking.

Dr. Matt is right. More and more colleges are finding that students have a very poor grasp of basic math. I know in Colorado some of the universities there were finding their remedial courses with larger numbers than the pre-cal and Calc courses. There was heat pushed onto the highschools because of how poorly the students did on the entrance exams (with were mostly algebra and geometry with a little algebra II and some trig).

<------------------married to math teacher who has taught the AP Calc classes a different schools in different states.

<-------------------also had to once walk a Mcarthur scholar through his own algebraic equation during a seminar.

[quote]Tex Ag wrote:

Based on my ACT and entrance exam I was pegged to start at Calc III. At the sit down orientation with my folks, they looked shocked and I laughed out loud- we all thought they were joking.

Dr. Matt is right. More and more colleges are finding that students have a very poor grasp of basic math. I know in Colorado some of the universities there were finding their remedial courses with larger numbers than the pre-cal and Calc courses. There was heat pushed onto the highschools because of how poorly the students did on the entrance exams (with were mostly algebra and geometry with a little algebra II and some trig).

<------------------married to math teacher who has taught the AP Calc classes a different schools in different states.

<-------------------also had to once walk a Mcarthur scholar through his own algebraic equation during a seminar.[/quote]

Your school let you start at calc 3? I have never seen a school that does that. Most schools will require that you either do an entire basic calculus course there or have it completed before transferring.

[quote]Dr.Matt581 wrote:

[quote]Tex Ag wrote:

Based on my ACT and entrance exam I was pegged to start at Calc III. At the sit down orientation with my folks, they looked shocked and I laughed out loud- we all thought they were joking.

Dr. Matt is right. More and more colleges are finding that students have a very poor grasp of basic math. I know in Colorado some of the universities there were finding their remedial courses with larger numbers than the pre-cal and Calc courses. There was heat pushed onto the highschools because of how poorly the students did on the entrance exams (with were mostly algebra and geometry with a little algebra II and some trig).

<------------------married to math teacher who has taught the AP Calc classes a different schools in different states.

<-------------------also had to once walk a Mcarthur scholar through his own algebraic equation during a seminar.[/quote]

Your school let you start at calc 3? I have never seen a school that does that. Most schools will require that you either do an entire basic calculus course there or have it completed before transferring. [/quote]

That is what they said but it is not what happened. I am a good multiple-guess math test taker. My wife is often surprised how quickly I can give a close enough answer to mathematical problems without having any conscious idea how the answer appeared to me (to be fair, I think multiple concussions during ky senior year in HS buried a lot of my understandings of math). Plus, I had a grant to study geology and starting at Calc III would have been really helpful.

Funny though was that the type of geology that I showed the greatest altitude towards required little math but math was why I switched to geography.

[quote]Dr.Matt581 wrote:

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I was not aware of any “accelerated classes”. People who wanted to finish quicker just took more hours. I knew a number who finished 4 or 5 year degrees in 3 years…but all they literally did was study and take tests. I for one am glad I stuck with the books in college…but I also like the fact that I enjoyed it too.

College is a cool time and basically the last chance you have before the real world slaps you in the face (which won’t be a pretty situation for MANY college students once they realize how their life choices really pay off). It helps to have some really good memories of it instead of just books.

To major in english and then take “biology and math” real fast makes little sense. If anything, do it the other way around.
[/quote]

You can take as many hours as you like when you petition but, you can not take pre-calc and calculus 1 in the same semester. He took the max allowable hours and then petitioned to be allowed to take more but, almost non where math or/science just those required in General Ed. and those for his minor. So, without a way to take move along faster he will essentially be taking just math/science courses for a few years. I have suggested ACT exams and credit by examination but, he will have to study on his own for that and ask his school about any issues.
[/quote]

ACT’s are an entrance exam, you don’t get credit for them. And if he is already taking or about to take precalc, then there is nothing he can do to accelerate the process. A standard two to three semester basic calculus sequence is a prerequisite for any higher math and you will not be allowed to take any of those concurrently or on an accelerated basis. Some schools have tried programs like that before and they have all failed miserably. I don’t know of any school these days that does that. The material is way too important to try and rush it. Once you are done with the basic calculus you can take more math classes at the same time (i.e. differential equations, linear algebra, non-euclidian geometry, and most theoretical mathematics classes can be taken concurrently but require a basic calculus sequence to take). Sorry, but your brother should have planned things better.

EDIT: Also, no school worth a damn will give credit by examination for anything above remedial college algebra. I doubt they even have tests for anything higher.
[/quote]

most any college will let you test into calc 1… since almost everyone makes it there in highschool… I tested out of algebra, but took trig again cause it was early in the morning and made me wake up, plus I liked trig…