T Nation

About That Last Keto Article


#1

Hey coach, Pharmacist here, huge fan of your no nonsense approach to lifting… I typically recommend your work and CT’s to most guys who ask me a thing or two about lifting weights. Can’t go wrong.

That said, that “ketosis is king in the event of metabolic disease” line really bugged me. Your audience (and it is pretty wide) and their families might do the exact opposite of what their disease would require them to do. IMHO the keto-friendly crowds should ask themselves the following questions:

  • what kind of way of eating were they on before going keto? Frankly, the half-conscious American Diet is usually void of nutrients and high in some carbs (mostly starches = pure glucose), while limiting fruits because of all the confusion around Sugar, and typically a hefty blend of IIFYM strategies leading to some moderate fat - moderate carb mix. According to Randle et al. back in the 60s when he put out the Randle cycle (and that cycle has never been disproven) the same way hyperglycemia and insulin are pretty much inhibiting fat oxidation, elevated fatty acids inhibit glucose oxidation. Thus there could be two kings here: very low carb ketogenic diets, and very low fat diets.

  • the truly low-fat crowd has been publishing impressive in-patient data for decades, whereas low carb diets consistently fail over the long run. Atkins warned against the dangers of his own diet. Epileptic kids weren’t free from seizures at all, and their diet was extreme anyway. Doctors like Swank, Esselstyn, Kempner, Greger, McDougall, Ornish, Campbell, Kahn… could clearly go ahead and claim that their low fat whole food mostly-if-not-all plant diets are Ace (if Keto is still king)

I’m going to suggest a decent read from a Doc I agree with on that matter, who has a decent, measured stance.

I’m aware that you’re extremely busy so let’s just grab the sources regarding ketosis and cancer:


Titles speak for themselves… The keto rabbithole is immensely deep and embracing maximal caution is warranted. Especially when we’re discussing cancer.

We have very limited data proving any specific benefit from ketogenic diets vs Metabolic syndrome, most subjects who lose weight improve their condition anyway. On a ketogenic diet, LDL consistently goes up, as thyroid function goes down. What should we do from such “adaptations”. What about potentially clogging arteries? Pictures can be worth a thousand words when it comes to high fat diets v low fat diets and blood flow.

Photos around 3:00 on that video. Greger is notorious for being heavily biased, however I’d at least recommend to keto enthusiasts that they regularly meet their cardiologist on such a diet and perform proper imagery.

Hopefully that helps some here.


#2

I wouldn’t want to hang such a theory on one invitro study, or insinuate that keto diets cause blocked arteries (most shitty diets should accomplish that). You would only have to look at the traditional Inuit diet to see such conditions were rare/nonexistent. So, it’s no rabbit hole really.


#3

Inuits don’t follow a keto diet - that’s a myth. Many of them were shown to eat up to 20 percent carbs. Also, all those studies about a lack of cardiovascular disease were fraudulent. All speculation. There was an article posted on the Canadian Journal of Cardiology that “leads us to the conclusion that Eskimos have a prevalence of [heart disease] similar to non-Eskimo population, they have excessive mortality due to cerebrovascular strokes, their overall mortality is twice as high as that of non-Eskimo populations, and their life expectancy is approximately 10 years shorter than the Danish population.” Its a decades old myth, the whole thing.


#4

Really, I do not recall reading anything that the work by Vilhjalmur Stefansson had been debunked.


#5

Ok so I will deal with that one since there’s a lot of follow up information.

There’s a study that Dominic D’aogistino did on rats to look at metastatic cancer and exogenous ketone supplementation even in a caloric surplus. The rats that had the diet in conjunction with the ketone supplementation (with tumors) had survival rates upwards of 60% compared to the control group.

This actually changed some thinking in the way of how ketogenic diets work against cancer (potentially). With the theory being that it was the starving of glucose to the cancer cells that showed promise in cancer treatments. But it could be that ketone bodies actually are toxic to cancer itself.

Dom and I are friends so I could bang him up for the mountain of studies he references regarding keto diets, ketones, and the starvation of cancer cells (but he takes forever and a day to get back with me because he’s kinda busy).

If I had to add the caveat to this it would be that keto diets done in a caloric deficit aren’t going to have any negative side effects in association with it. I would assume that a keto diet in a caloric surplus, just like any other diet done in a surplus, would have some negative side effects associated with it. I mean, it’s not like non-keto people aren’t suffering from clogged arteries. That seems to be an issue society wide in virtually any surplus dietary condition.

More research needs to be done, but we’ve got enough animal model studies to see that there is probably something good about going keto if you’re suffering from some sort of metabolic disease.