T Nation

A Decent BodyBuilding Book


#1

Ok I am a litle new to the bodybuilding world.. i did before some other sports(box one year) and went to the gym for about 3 munth and than i quit. Now i am going to the gym (2 month) without a clear program( i am changing them a lot) ...
I actualy wanted to know the best way to get the most of bodybuilding , and i am really motivated about this..

I read about 2 -3 book mentioning here No_Nonsense_Muscle_Building(even i am not skinny) and New rule of Lifting by Lou Schuler and Alwyn Cosgrove ...and of corse Poplinque Principles (very good book but not finished reading it yet).
Actully i tried one 3 week fat loss program writen in it was really cool.
But some of the books end up contradicting each other and i get really messy in the end.

I was looking for a book with more specific goals like gaining muscle ore lossing fat ,alsow it should include periodisation and should be writen in an understandable way(New rule of lifting is one but i am not shure about it)....in less word somthing that can be consulted over a longer period of time.So i can build my oun program in th
AND MOST IMPORTANT SOMETHING THAT IS PROVEN THAT WORKS and is build for natural bodybuilders!!!

Some sugested me Starting Strength of Mark Riptoe as a beginer book.But it tolks only for strength ..what about the other phases??
So u can shugest one book for each phase ore one that includes them all.

So got any good option ?? Thank u in advance guys.


#2

Is English your first language? I could hardly understand what I was reading.


#3

Sorry I will try to edit it … no its not


#4

[quote]Bloobird wrote:
Is English your first language? I could hardly understand what I was reading.[/quote]

Sorry i will try to edit it… No English is not my first language …


#5

How about this site and its free great articles? And not forgetting the forums. There are tons of valuable information here, just go through the old threads.


#6

[quote]Taufiq wrote:
How about this site and its free great articles? And not forgetting the forums. There are tons of valuable information here, just go through the old threads.[/quote]

Hi

I knew there are a lot of information on forums but pll often contradict each other and i get messy in the end .Anyway i think that someone can have proper basis with a good book and than can use the forum (not that much).


#7

[quote]H89K wrote:
Taufiq wrote:
How about this site and its free great articles? And not forgetting the forums. There are tons of valuable information here, just go through the old threads.

Hi

I knew there are a lot of information on forums but pll often contradict each other and i get messy in the end .Anyway i think that someone can have proper basis with a good book and than can use the forum (not that much).[/quote]

There are a lot of great books out there, but many of them will also provide different opinions on how to build muscle or lose fat and reading all of them will make you more and more confused. The best way is to stick with one book or author, then just put your trust on the program and do everything that is told.

If I have to choose a book to recommend, I guess I’ll go for Jason Ferrugia’s Muscle Building Secret. Many things that a beginner should know is included in there; focusing on the big compound movements, trying very hard to improve every single workout, the importance of eating enough, how to periodize properly etc.

I also like Dorian Yates’ book.


#8

The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding, and The Education of a Bodybuilder (both by Arnold) were great and I think most beginners would do a lot better following the advice in those books rather than the magazines and internet gurus who claim that its all a bunch of crazy nonsense.


#9

[quote]mr popular wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding, and The Education of a Bodybuilder (both by Arnold) were great and I think most beginners would do a lot better following the advice in those books rather than the magazines and internet gurus who claim that its all a bunch of crazy nonsense.[/quote]

I dont think Arnolds book are for me…they have big workout routines (extending 1.5 hours) …might be better for someone eho uses steroids


#10

[quote]H89K wrote:
New rule of lifting is one but i am not shure about it[/quote]

New Rules of Lifting is a good plan written by guys who know what they’re talking about. I don’t remember how long that program is, but if you just stick to it as written, you can’t go wrong.

Built for Show is another book that outlines how to train in different phases for an entire year. That might also be what you’re looking for.

Also, I don’t think you need to read too much more right now, because it sounds like you’ll get more confused. But in a while, check this thread for a list of some other helpful books:


#11

[quote]H89K wrote:
mr popular wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding, and The Education of a Bodybuilder (both by Arnold) were great and I think most beginners would do a lot better following the advice in those books rather than the magazines and internet gurus who claim that its all a bunch of crazy nonsense.

I dont think Arnolds book are for me…they have big workout routines (extending 1.5 hours) …might be better for someone eho uses steroids[/quote]

The Modern Encyclopedia is one of the best and largest resources for “how to do an exercise,” with pretty good descriptions and clear pictures.

The programs… those are another story. But the exercise descriptions themselves, and the motivational pictures throughout the book, make it a good choice.


#12

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
H89K wrote:
mr popular wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding, and The Education of a Bodybuilder (both by Arnold) were great and I think most beginners would do a lot better following the advice in those books rather than the magazines and internet gurus who claim that its all a bunch of crazy nonsense.

I dont think Arnolds book are for me…they have big workout routines (extending 1.5 hours) …might be better for someone eho uses steroids

The Modern Encyclopedia is one of the best and largest resources for “how to do an exercise,” with pretty good descriptions and clear pictures.

The programs… those are another story. But the exercise descriptions themselves, and the motivational pictures throughout the book, make it a good choice.[/quote]

Yeah but u can find a lot of books that describe how to do exercises


#13

[quote]H89K wrote:
mr popular wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding, and The Education of a Bodybuilder (both by Arnold) were great and I think most beginners would do a lot better following the advice in those books rather than the magazines and internet gurus who claim that its all a bunch of crazy nonsense.

I dont think Arnolds book are for me…they have big workout routines (extending 1.5 hours) …might be better for someone eho uses steroids[/quote]

The book talks a great deal about lifting, diet, injuries, developing specific bodyparts, and bodybuilding history. The bigger programs are something you reach after you’ve been training a long time, but the beginner program shouldn’t be a problem for anyone who is eating enough - that said, it’s not necessary that you do it. It’s just a suggestion the book makes, and its a very small part of the total read.


#14

[quote]mr popular wrote:
H89K wrote:
mr popular wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding, and The Education of a Bodybuilder (both by Arnold) were great and I think most beginners would do a lot better following the advice in those books rather than the magazines and internet gurus who claim that its all a bunch of crazy nonsense.

I dont think Arnolds book are for me…they have big workout routines (extending 1.5 hours) …might be better for someone eho uses steroids

The book talks a great deal about lifting, diet, injuries, developing specific bodyparts, and bodybuilding history. The bigger programs are something you reach after you’ve been training a long time, but the beginner program shouldn’t be a problem for anyone who is eating enough - that said, it’s not necessary that you do it. It’s just a suggestion the book makes, and its a very small part of the total read.[/quote]

Those books are pretty long, I don’t think my eyes could handle all that reading. That might be better for someone on steroids.


#15

[quote]eeu743 wrote:
mr popular wrote:
H89K wrote:
mr popular wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding, and The Education of a Bodybuilder (both by Arnold) were great and I think most beginners would do a lot better following the advice in those books rather than the magazines and internet gurus who claim that its all a bunch of crazy nonsense.

I dont think Arnolds book are for me…they have big workout routines (extending 1.5 hours) …might be better for someone eho uses steroids

The book talks a great deal about lifting, diet, injuries, developing specific bodyparts, and bodybuilding history. The bigger programs are something you reach after you’ve been training a long time, but the beginner program shouldn’t be a problem for anyone who is eating enough - that said, it’s not necessary that you do it. It’s just a suggestion the book makes, and its a very small part of the total read.

Those books are pretty long, I don’t think my eyes could handle all that reading. That might be better for someone on steroids.
[/quote]

They also have the drug-free versions: books on tape

That way when people ask what you’re reading, but are puzzled when they discover you’re hardly absorbing any of the material, you can scoff at them and let them know it’s because you’re all-natural, and don’t need any of that reading comprehension enhancement monkey juice. That shit makes your dick small anyway.