T Nation

A Cycle Without One Competition Lift?


#1

How often (if ever) do those of you who compete regularly do a training cycle that does not contain one of the lifts in their competition form? I mean doing 6-12 weeks with only close grip benching, front/ high bar squats, or opposite-stance deadlifts.

For context: I have my first meet coming up in a week. Focused solely on that currently, but I'd like to have a plan for what to do once it's over. Planning on running a linear program (greyskull or something similar) while losing 8-10 lbs over 10-12 weeks. I've been toying with the idea of doing trap bar deadlifts during this time because 1. I haven't done them in a long time and likely will be able to progress on them weekly, while I'm not sure thats the case with conventional deads, 2. I tend to go a bit nuts with deads, especially when I'm given a "+" set. This can make recovery difficult, especially in a calorie deficit. 3. My low back has been feeling shitty lately so taking a more upright stance with the trap bar sounds appealing to my -- I guess you could say -- softer side.

My only real concern is that I obviously don't want to spend a a few months building up a lift that won't have any carry over into my next competition. Currently weigh 184 with lifts at 315/225/415 (but will beat all or most of those by 10-20 lbs in a week) and want to end the training cycle around 175 with gym lifts at 350/250/450.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.


#2

I pretty much only hit the comp lifts in competition (with the bench being a little more frequent in my training). That said, my variations aren’t too far off from the actual competition lifts, and tend to just be partials while still employing similar mechanics. I dont think the trap bar will improve your comp lifts that well, based on personal experience, but something like a partial dead might.


#3

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I pretty much only hit the comp lifts in competition (with the bench being a little more frequent in my training). That said, my variations aren’t too far off from the actual competition lifts, and tend to just be partials while still employing similar mechanics. I dont think the trap bar will improve your comp lifts that well, based on personal experience, but something like a partial dead might.[/quote]

Thanks for the input. I know how much you love that partial ROM training. My two concerns with a partial dead are that I’m weak off the floor (I’ve only once missed a lift that I was able to get off the ground) and also that the only blocks I have are about 4 inches high and I built them myself. Not sure they’d stand up to the abuse of 400 + lbs on a weekly basis. For the record, that has nothing to do with me thinking that 400 lbs is a heavy deadlift and everything to do with me thinking I’m a lousy craftsman.


#4

I use rubber patio tiles to avoid the latter issue. For the former, I find that weakness off the floor tends to be one of a technique issue rather than strength. That said, a partial doesn’t necessarily have to be from the top down. You could always do a partial off the floor, or a pause deadlift.

I have had great success in increasing my pull off the floor without ever pulling heavy off the floor, for what it is worth. I went from a 525 dead to 585 pulling heavy partials and light floor pulls for max reps, switching each week.


#5

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I use rubber patio tiles to avoid the latter issue. For the former, I find that weakness off the floor tends to be one of a technique issue rather than strength. That said, a partial doesn’t necessarily have to be from the top down. You could always do a partial off the floor, or a pause deadlift.

I have had great success in increasing my pull off the floor without ever pulling heavy off the floor, for what it is worth. I went from a 525 dead to 585 pulling heavy partials and light floor pulls for max reps, switching each week.[/quote]

Thanks for the tip on the patio tilesâ?¦ I might have to pick some up.

The answer might be to do something like that for my dead and keep the classic linear progression for my bench and squat.


#6

Almost never. I found for myself that when I get away from the competition lifts, they tend to suffer. I did box squats and deficit deadlifts for a cycle and got really good at them, however they didn’t really translate to competitions lifts.
I usually keep the other stuff as secondary moves. Front squats, rack pulls, inclines, overhead etc.
Again that was just me. There are many more experienced lifters than I who have had great success without training the competition lifts constantly.


#7

[quote]Alrightmiami19c wrote:
Almost never. I found for myself that when I get away from the competition lifts, they tend to suffer. I did box squats and deficit deadlifts for a cycle and got really good at them, however they didn’t really translate to competitions lifts.
I usually keep the other stuff as secondary moves. Front squats, rack pulls, inclines, overhead etc.
Again that was just me. There are many more experienced lifters than I who have had great success without training the competition lifts constantly. [/quote]

Im the same way, after doing box squats, over head pressing, and deficit deadlifts I found they only helped me get better at those lifts and not a noticeable carryover to my main movements.


#8

[quote]cparker wrote:

[quote]Alrightmiami19c wrote:
Almost never. I found for myself that when I get away from the competition lifts, they tend to suffer. I did box squats and deficit deadlifts for a cycle and got really good at them, however they didn’t really translate to competitions lifts.
I usually keep the other stuff as secondary moves. Front squats, rack pulls, inclines, overhead etc.
Again that was just me. There are many more experienced lifters than I who have had great success without training the competition lifts constantly. [/quote]
Im the same way, after doing box squats, over head pressing, and deficit deadlifts I found they only helped me get better at those lifts and not a noticeable carryover to my main movements.[/quote]
Were you still doing the competition lifts at all during those times?

I would think that you’d get detrained somewhat if you actually neglected the competition lifts, no matter how good the carryover was. I’d expect something of an initial dip, but then things to continue back up if there was good carryover.


#9

Unless I’m injured, the competition lifts get done every week. Practice makes perfect.