T Nation

A Chinese Hummer?

[i]General Motors (GM) has agreed to sell its iconic Hummer brand to Chinese firm Sichuan Tengzhong Heavy Industrial Machinery for an undisclosed fee. The two parties had been in talks about the sale for a number of months.

GM is in the process of selling and winding up a number of brands as it looks to reorganize after emerging from bankruptcy protection in July. At the start of this month, the troubled carmaker announced it would be winding down its Saturn brand.

This was after the proposed sale to Penske Automotive Group collapsed. GM has already announced that it is discontinuing the Pontiac brand, and is close to finalizing the sale of its European brands Saab, Opel and Vauxhall.[/i]

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/8300102.stm

I just hope they take the H2, add a turbo diesel with a transfer case that goes between 2 and 4 wheel and sell a 24mpg hummer (there are 3 shops in the US that already do this so yes, its possible)…

I loved the h2 look but I hated the bull shit engine GM put in it… and honestly, with the way GM is going I am glad the hummer brand wont die with it…

Big Hummer Turns Tiny Asians Into Men.

Headline from the future

This piece of shit will never be in my driveway. Chinese toys? fine, Chinese computers? Not perfect but I’ll deal. Chinese cars? Fuck no, ever.

Chinese Hummer: Brow-job

Example: “Hey Joe! Foh two dorrah, I give you brow-job. Me sucky sucky, ruv you rong time!”

[quote]SteelyD wrote:
Chinese Hummer: Brow-job

Example: “Hey Joe! Foh two dorrah, I give you brow-job. Me sucky sucky, ruv you rong time!”

[/quote]

ha!

Let them have the Hummer, who cares. What I’m worried about is if China takes the lead in green energy manufacturing… building solar panels, windmills, turbines etc… I think if they take the lead on that, we could lose out, big time. We want to manufacture that stuff here, not import it from China.

Well,I for one can tell you from the outside,that ‘Made in USA’ still carries weight,at least for me.Bought an MSD ignition box and an MSD Blaster coil for my car few months back.Twice,the coil had to replaced and eventually refunded.It was made in china.The ignition box is sweet as a nut and I’m pleased as punch with it.It bears the ‘Made in USA’ logo.I paid twice the price you guys pay over there,but it cost me around 4 times less than the Bosch box it replaced would have set me back.And the car goes better with it.

[quote]K2000 wrote:
Let them have the Hummer, who cares. What I’m worried about is if China takes the lead in green energy manufacturing… building solar panels, windmills, turbines etc… I think if they take the lead on that, we could lose out, big time. We want to manufacture that stuff here, not import it from China.[/quote]

The Environmental Lobby and the Unions have made sure none of those things will be manufactured in the United States on any competitive level with any other countries, and that’s pretty much across the board in most (all?) manufacturing sectors.

I live in a ‘forestry’ state. The saw mills have closed (union demands/environmental regulation). The paper mills have closed (union demands/environmental regulation). The textile mills that made other things from the wood have closed (union demands/environmental regulation).

It’s cheaper to cut the trees, load them on a ship to another country, have them cut/process the wood, and reimport it than it is to do any of that on site. Labor costs, environmental regulation.

Don’t worry, the Hummer isn’t the last vehicle to go to China. The US auto industry is very close to D.E.D. dead.

Let them have the Hummer. Unfortunately all the hard work of R&D that has gone into it will be lost on the Chinese. They just want to crank out Hummers. When the Japs knocked off an item at the start of their 2nd industrial revolution, they would put the engineering back into the it and their quality improved in time. The Chinese are a different breed, they are in it for the quick buck and will take many shortcuts along the way.

BG

[quote]SteelyD wrote:
K2000 wrote:
Let them have the Hummer, who cares. What I’m worried about is if China takes the lead in green energy manufacturing… building solar panels, windmills, turbines etc… I think if they take the lead on that, we could lose out, big time. We want to manufacture that stuff here, not import it from China.

The Environmental Lobby and the Unions have made sure none of those things will be manufactured in the United States on any competitive level with any other countries, and that’s pretty much across the board in most (all?) manufacturing sectors.

I live in a ‘forestry’ state. The saw mills have closed (union demands/environmental regulation). The paper mills have closed (union demands/environmental regulation). The textile mills that made other things from the wood have closed (union demands/environmental regulation).[/quote]

Oh come on, you must have just stolen that out of Atlas Shrugged.

There’s no way that unions, environmentalists, and the politicians that work hand in hand with them could have caused such a thing. Why, they are our friends and America will be more productive and prosperous than ever thanks to their programs.

Plus, if you knew anything, you’d know that stricter environmental regulations create MORE jobs and are GOOD for the economy.

Haven’t you heard Obama say how he is counting on green jobs to lead the way for the new economy?

You really should have known.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Plus, if you knew anything, you’d know that stricter U.S. environmental regulations create MORE Chinese jobs and are GOOD for China’s economy.

Haven’t you heard Obama say how he is counting on green jobs to lead the way for the new Chinese economy?

You really should have known.[/quote]

You’re absolutely correct. I just fixed a couple things in your last post to clarify.

:slight_smile:

[quote]SteelyD wrote:
It’s cheaper to cut the trees, load them on a ship to another country, have them cut/process the wood, and reimport it than it is to do any of that on site. Labor costs, environmental regulation.
[/quote]

That’s just sad.

[quote]Sloth wrote:
SteelyD wrote:
It’s cheaper to cut the trees, load them on a ship to another country, have them cut/process the wood, and reimport it than it is to do any of that on site. Labor costs, environmental regulation.

That’s just sad.

[/quote]

It is. It’s not just wood. Steel industry, same. Anyone from Pittsburgh/Johnstown? Glass industry, same. I grew up in a (south Jersey) town that for about the 100 years prior to the 80’s was one of the number one glass producers in the world. In mid-century, chances were better than half that wherever you were in the world, if you were drinking Coca-Cola from a bottle, it came from that town. The main plant closed in the 80’s (in part due to plastics, but also in part for reasons above).

After that, it was mostly used for glass inspection and recycling. Now, check this out. A lot various glass was trucked into that plant, sorted, recycled, inspected, etc., trucked out to port (Delaware River/Bay), shipped to Latin America, glass product created, shipped back, and then distributed----- because it’s cheaper now than operating at the plant.

Add on top of this that the reason the industry even existed there was because of the vast deposits of fine, homogeneous quartz sand (perfect for making glass). Most of the sand plants have closed (environmental/unions), and those that are still open (US Silica, etc) mine the sand and ship it out of country. This, when there are dozens of (former) glass plants within a few 10’s of miles.

Of course there is some irony in that those ‘glass towns’ that had their industry driven out in part because of skyrocketing operating costs because of environmental regulations (to be replaced by plastics!), were ‘recycling’ glass all throughout the 19th and 20th centuries— and usually paying dollars/cents per pound of sorted glass (ie green, clear, brown, etc). I remember as a young kid driving with my grandfather every Saturday to ‘recycle the glass’.

What, coal too?

But the Prince of Peace said:

"Under my plan of a cap and trade system, electricity rates would necessarily skyrocket.

"Regardless of what I say about whether coal is good or bad, because I’m capping greenhouse gases, coal power plants, you know, natural gas, you name it, whatever the plants were, whatever the industry was, they would have to retrofit their operations. That will cost money. They will pass that money on to consumers…

"Let me sort of describe my overall policy. What I’ve said is that we would put a cap and trade system in place that is more – that is as aggressive, if not more aggressive than anybody else’s out there…

"An auction on the cap and trade system, which means that every unit of carbon or greenhouse gases that was emitted would be charged to the polluter. That will create a market in which whatever technologies are out there that are being presented, whatever power plants that are being built that they would have to meet the rigors of that market and the ratcheted down caps that are placed, imposed every year.

“So if somebody wants to build a coal powered plant, they can. It’s just that it will bankrupt them because they are going to be charged a huge sum for all that greenhouse gas that’s being emitted.”

Now, is that a super plan for economic recovery and job growth, or is that a super plan?

Wesley Mouch is back.

[quote]SteelyD wrote:

It is. It’s not just wood. Steel industry, same. Anyone from Pittsburgh/Johnstown? [/quote]

It’s terrible. I’m from Pittsburgh, and you can’t even tell that we used to be the “Steel Capital of the World”. All the mills were torn down, and now you can’t even tell they were there. At one time, there were 117 blast furnaces in western PA. Now, there are 2 active in all of PA (they’re in Pittsburgh). We have one steel mill in Pittsburgh now, and it’s just really sad. I’m currently attending Pitt for mechanical engineering, and I interned at the Edgar Thomson Works here. Working there made me realize how many jobs were lost, how much money stopped coming into the area, and how the US lost a really interesting industry. Now, Pittsburgh is made up of depressed areas that went to shit once its mills and residents left.

A steel mill is one of the most complex, interesting places. Once you’re standing a foot away from molten iron flowing down a trough from the blast furnace, other jobs just don’t compare.

[quote]Scuba19 wrote:
SteelyD wrote:
A steel mill is one of the most complex, interesting places. Once you’re standing a foot away from molten iron flowing down a trough from the blast furnace, other jobs just don’t compare.[/quote]

This is when you become a Metallurgist and understand the process and live it for the rest of your life!!

Luke!! come to the dark side !!!

-seriously though, if you really do like it, go after a masters in metallurgy-

[quote]Ratchet wrote:
Scuba19 wrote:
SteelyD wrote:
A steel mill is one of the most complex, interesting places. Once you’re standing a foot away from molten iron flowing down a trough from the blast furnace, other jobs just don’t compare.

This is when you become a Metallurgist and understand the process and live it for the rest of your life!!

Luke!! come to the dark side !!!

-seriously though, if you really do like it, go after a masters in metallurgy-[/quote]

I’m already doing a minor/concentration in ferrous physical metallurgy, so I’m headed in that direction. However, with the way things are going along with certain bills that are waiting to be voted on (cap & trade), there may be no steel industry left in the US.