T Nation

9-11 Remembrance Thread

It’s hard to believe that nine years have passed since it happened. Nine years ago, we all felt the shock of something that seemed surreal, almost incomprehensible. Something that halted the peace that Amereica is so used to.

Nine years ago, I lost a dear friend.

He was a firefighter who perished trying to save others. I’m sure all of us remember that day like it was not so long ago, so let us remember it forever, along with those lost in this tragedy.

RIP to everyone that passed away that horrible day.

[quote]Sarev0k wrote:
It’s hard to believe that nine years have passed since it happened. Nine years ago, we all felt the shock of something that seemed surreal, almost incomprehensible. Something that halted the peace that Amereica is so used to.

Nine years ago, I lost a dear friend.

He was a firefighter who perished trying to save others. I’m sure all of us remember that day like it was not so long ago, so let us remember it forever, along with those lost in this tragedy.[/quote]

x2

There playing the news broadcasting from 9 years ago on msnbc. Talk about bringing back memories. The same news that we were probably all glued to that day.
I was 4 months pregnant at the time with out first. I had the day off but had a meeting to go to so I was ironing my uniform.
I was called at about 930am and told not come in(I was still in the Navy)
Normally I watch the news while getting ready for work, but I wasn’t that morning.

My hubby was out already out to sea doing work ups down near FL, on the GW(USS George Washinton)
They were the first nuclear ship to enter the harbors of NY in 20+ years and made it in record time.

He is currently in Afghanistan.

Funny how easily we remark, “That was the worst day of my life” about things that, in hindsight, are trivial. 9-11 was truly the worst day of my life and on my 100th birthday I will still remember and I will still cry. I didn’t lose a friend or loved one like you did Sarev. Your friend was one of many true heroes that day. We saw the worst and the best all on the same day. Americans lost our sense of security in our homeland. We also pulled together and honored our heroes the way they should be every.single.day. Let us never forget.

What a horrible day that was. 9 years later, you tend to push the gravity of it to the back of your mind, then you see the footage of it again on TV and it takes you right back.

I hope this thread doesn’t deteriorate into a debate about who caused it. The bottom line is a bunch of innocent people went to work that day and didn’t come home.

Remember those that gave their lives so that others could live, who ran into burning towers to do whatever they could to ensure that this great country would remain the land of the free and the home of the brave.

And thanks to all serving or who have served…to there loved ones as well.

Never forgotten, always remembered. Thank you to all our men and women in uniform, and those they leave here at home while they fight our wars.

There are so many miraculous stories from that day, stories of true heroism, from the first responders to the hundreds of volunteers who rushed to help.

Thank you to all who have served and who still serve to keep our country safe.

I was in Taiwan and Taiwan is 12 hours ahead of NY so it happened at night here. Strange.

I came home after being out for a long walk and didn’t know what had happened. My roommates were watching it on TV when I got home and they asked me if I’d heard the news, I said no, so they told me. It was surreal being told about the two planes and the building being gone all in one minute. I remember asking 3 or 4 times “What do you mean gone?” Just terrible. I felt like shit for a few days after that. Just depressed.

[quote]PimpBot5000 wrote:
What a horrible day that was. 9 years later, you tend to push the gravity of it to the back of your mind, then you see the footage of it again on TV and it takes you right back.

I hope this thread doesn’t deteriorate into a debate about who caused it. The bottom line is a bunch of innocent people went to work that day and didn’t come home.[/quote]
It really is crazy how it feels like yesterday. I was in 7th grade and I can remember the craziest aspects of that day. Which classes I had, which teachers were crying behind me as I stared at the TV clueless, and then the news I watched at home afterwards on my little white TV that still seems to work.

I just watched some videos on youtube. Towers falling, the second plane hitting, some Bush speeches, national anthems on WWF and the ball park, David Letterman… you get my point. I still feel pissed and angry. This was a bad idea watching these before sleep.

I was watching the second plane impact videos in particular, and I swear my heart was beating so fast in anticipation it felt like I was having a panic attack. And that was from watching it in my room, 9 years later, on youtube. Imagine how a firefighter would feel when you approach the WTC, look up, and see burning debris falling everywhere, even bodies hitting the ground from people jumping. Imagine how they felt.

I fucking love being an American. But the job is not done. We will bring every last scumbag terrorist to justice.

I was at Camp Hovey, Korea, and ironically enough, woke up to my tv on CNN, where they had just began reporting about the first plane to hit. I then watched as the second one hit. I immediately got dressed and reported, as I knew we would be put on high alert. This capped off 52 straight hours of guard duty. I’m currently in Afghanistan seeking vengeance for that long stint. In all seriousness, my first thought were for the people of NYC, and of my mother, who worked behind the towers before we moved to VA.

I was standing in line, picking my nose, waiting for my chocolate milk and burrito.

i remember coming back from school that day and my dad sitting me down in front of the tv and just saying ‘watch this, this will change the world’.

[quote]Beast27195 wrote:
I’m currently in Afghanistan seeking vengeance for that long stint. [/quote]

What part??

MiM,

I’m currently at FOB Lagman. Where’s the hubby located?

Bagram AFB.

I watched The History Channel’s piece, “102 Minutes That Changed America”.

This was a collection of unedited video clips from ordinary people who witnessed the events that occurred that day. In many ways this was more emotionally gripping than the newsreels we’ve come to know from that day.

Seeing a large group a brave firefighters heading into the WTC… the last images of these brave men captured on film, as well as the awful scenes of people plummeting to their deaths from the upper floors of the buildings, were the visuals that were the most hard-hitting for me… the ones that put a human face on that day.

Also, hearing the emotional (sometimes hysterical) cries of those who were taping these scenes, as well as the faces of those on the street as they first became aware of what was going on, was quite jarring.

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
as well as the awful scenes of people plummeting to their deaths from the upper floors of the buildings[/quote]

This is something that still gets me to this day. I can’t even wrap my mind around what those people had to go through. Choosing to jump to their death rather than burn to death