T Nation

77-Pound Powerlifter


Jordan Byrnes. Opinions, thoughts, comments?

Ive seen a few kids on youtube like this. One was even screaming and raising his arms like he was in a bench shirt.

I discovered him when looking up info on raw powerlifting.


I believe he’s the current NY state bench press record holder, at 35 pounds or so. I might be off on that.


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So the question to you competitors out there, if your kids showed an interest in the sport, would you let them go for it?

I don’t believe there’s anything wrong with gradually introducing kids to weight training, but competitive powerlifting seems like a different animal entirely.

I don’t think I’d be comfortable having a little fella going for contest maxes on any type of regular basis at all, let alone a kid who’s barely a decade old.

Is there any reason that kids shouldn’t compete in powerlifting? Are you worried about back, knee, elbow, problems later down the road? Just curious.

If it was the only sport he participated in I would worry. If he played multiple others I wouldn’t mind. I am with the “discourage from specialization camp” until the middle teens.

Gotta love that he’s got all 3 spotters on the squat. Not that I’m saying he shouldn’t.

Solid depth.

This is a long debated subject. Some research suggests that strenuous exercise by adolescents prior to their growth plates closing can stunt their growth. I wouldn’t completely discount this theory. I would say for kid to keep it light hearted, focus on general exercise, only do the contests for fun, and wait until his older to really get serious.

Bulgarian weightlifting coaches have their lifters start out at the age of ten, that kid is just an infant.

Nothing wrong with this stuff for kids as long as training is balanced, form is good, diet etc… is good

But - a bit of a waste of time when so young, better to engage in other activities as a higher priority. Can do weights as well but not 3x a day 5 times a week. Unless it is your olympic destiny … like the chinese lifters who are selected and train their whole life

these days to compete you pretty much have to start young. and if not these days, then, in 10-20 years it definetly will be the case

I see nothing wrong with this. He’s a little guy. But it’s not like he’s gonna tear a patella tendon squatting. It’s way safer than climbing trees or riding wheelies next to a busy street.

Man, god forbid the kid actually ENJOYS the sport, and WANTS to do it.

I always hate the presumptions made in these threads. I did Tae Kwon Do as a kid, and went as often as I could, because I fucking loved it. I didn’t think I was “wasting my time” or “do other things”, because I was having fun.

Goddamn, there are kids that spend way more time playing video games than this kid does lifting weights. Good on him for not being one of the millions of obese kids in America.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
Bulgarian weightlifting coaches have their lifters start out at the age of ten, that kid is just an infant.[/quote]

bulgarians are pussies

bosnians teach their kids to walk by doing lunges.

dude that kid aint an infant, but if it were my kid, he wouldnt be maxing out on lifting till at least 6th grade, guz i dont know bout yous, but i enjoy bein 6’, i dont wanna be like my powerlifting buddy vince and bein 5’1". if my boy wants to work out with me, i will let him when hes old enough, that kid definately aint

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Man, god forbid the kid actually ENJOYS the sport, and WANTS to do it.

I always hate the presumptions made in these threads. I did Tae Kwon Do as a kid, and went as often as I could, because I fucking loved it. I didn’t think I was “wasting my time” or “do other things”, because I was having fun.

Goddamn, there are kids that spend way more time playing video games than this kid does lifting weights. Good on him for not being one of the millions of obese kids in America.[/quote]

As a previous poster stated, the question really is whether or not weightlifting stunts growth in children. I’ve always heard kids should stick to calisthenics until they’re done with most of their growing.

[quote]sscannon wrote:
T3hPwnisher wrote:
Man, god forbid the kid actually ENJOYS the sport, and WANTS to do it.

I always hate the presumptions made in these threads. I did Tae Kwon Do as a kid, and went as often as I could, because I fucking loved it. I didn’t think I was “wasting my time” or “do other things”, because I was having fun.

Goddamn, there are kids that spend way more time playing video games than this kid does lifting weights. Good on him for not being one of the millions of obese kids in America.

As a previous poster stated, the question really is whether or not weightlifting stunts growth in children. I’ve always heard kids should stick to calisthenics until they’re done with most of their growing.[/quote]

I never understand this mentality really. I don’t understand how lifting a heavy object (your body) is better than lifting a heavy object (iron).

Kids don’t need to be maxing on lifts constantly, no, but resistance is resistance.

That kid must be a deadlifting beast with that one inch ROM. Kidding, hopefully he sticks with it

Growth plate fusion in children and adolescents has never been supported by any study. The numbers sighted are usually produced by the Consumer Product Safety Commission and are skewed. The injury numbers are sighted in young people (5-24 is the range) and encompass a litany of injuries. Growth plate injury is sighted as being associated with bone injury.

The American Council of Pediatrics named some of these statistics in a report and so weightlifting now “stunts the growth of children.” It is a grossly distorted statistic and the morality argument that “no study could be done because of the potential dangers” is used to differ any further discourse.