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5x5 or 3x10 for High Jump?

i need to get more explosive and stronger for high jump. i don’t care about size or how i look i just want to get stronger at my lifts.

im a going to start doing a full body routine 3 days a week. my workouts will consist of squats,step ups, lunges,bench press,leg press,bicep curls,push press,deadlifts,sit ups,planches,tricep extensions and roman deadlifts. i will be doing all of these exercise on different days. i will be changing them up every day i workout. for example switching up

I assume you’ll edit your post since it seems incomplete atm. That being said,

  1. It’s a ROMANIAN deadlift.
  2. Too many exercises at once.
  3. Don’t write your own program. You have zero experience with it.
  4. Generally, jumps should be done for low reps if explosiveness is the goal.
  5. What have you been doing for the past six months?

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
I assume you’ll edit your post since it seems incomplete atm. That being said,

  1. It’s a ROMANIAN deadlift.
  2. Too many exercises at once.
  3. Don’t write your own program. You have zero experience with it.
  4. Generally, jumps should be done for low reps if explosiveness is the goal.
  5. What have you been doing for the past six months?[/quote]
    x2 all of this.

Bolt, what you laid out is a terrible plan that’s going to waste more time and energy. There are so many better options out there, but you know that because you’ve heard it before.

How have you been training the last few months? And what are your current bests on the basic lifts (squat, bench, deadlift, clean, row)?

Your routine is scattered.
Find a program from a respected trainer. There are a LOT of exercises that will benefit you. How they work together and how to progress is where the issue is.
Anyone can list a dozen good exercises, kettlebell swing, power snatch, power clean, box squats, depth jumps, deadlift, rack pull, 1/4 speed squats, split squats, front foot elevated split squats, sled push, dumbbell clean and press, barbell push press…now, should you do all of these for 10 sets of 3 every workout??
What are you doing now?

right now i am not really working out since im on summer vacation and its ramadan. i haven’t lifted in awhile.
my stats right now are
Bench:115 goal:225
Squat:125 goal:250 or above
Deadlift:135 goal:300 or above
Db curl:25lbs goal:45lb with one arm

I use to be able to lift more but most of this year i did a lot of cardio and not that much resistance training.once i start lifting again hopefully muscle memory will help me regain my lost strength

i know my routine is terrible. i just can’t think of another routine that can help with high jump. i will just try to find one on the internet.

[quote]libanbolt wrote:
i know my routine is terrible. i just can’t think of another routine that can help with high jump. i will just try to find one on the internet. [/quote]

Holy mother of…

OK, first of all, stop fucking skipping weight training. ‘I haven’t been training for the past months’ and you’re surprised by anything? How about, for starters, you just pick a beginner program and follow it to the letter for 6 months while taking care of your diet - and then you just add 5x5 box jumps before one of your squat sessions? That, if done consistently, will do way more for you than all the shit you’ve contemplated since you started your account. You want a 225 bench? How about you train consistently enough to get to 135 first! Jesus.

[quote]libanbolt wrote:
right now i am not really working out since im on summer vacation and its ramadan. i haven’t lifted in awhile.[/quote]
Six weeks ago, you said your track coach gave you a workout. Guess that didn’t pan out too well? Best of luck telling him you ignored his advice like you’ve been ignoring ours for a while.

You’re not regaining anything. Muscle memory has absolutely nothing to do with it.

Do this. It’s a program from Dan John, who’s coached high school and college track and field athletes for decades.:

Do 4 weeks with the 8-6-4 plan and then right into 12 weeks with the 5x5 work. Your Number One job for those 16 weeks is to train 3 days a week without missing a single workout. If you can’t do that, I don’t know what to tell you.

You’ve been trying to find a program on the Internet, on this site in particular. For almost a full year.

Dude, you have to recognize that you are completely fucking yourself over and wasting time. You need to buckle down and stick to something or else another track season will come and go, and you’ll be unhappy and disappointed with how it turns out.

I do think it’s a good thing that you’ve shifted from “training for abs” to training for performance. It’s just that you don’t seem to actually be putting the work in. At this point, you’ve heard everything you need to hear. It’s up to you to put it into action, day to day, week to week, and month to month.

I would advise you not to lift weights or pursue athletics. With every false start, you break faith with yourself. This will damage your psyche and eat away at your self-respect. Your mindset is not conducive to athletic success.

Chris Colucci, god bless you but I can’t begin to imagine what moves you to invest as much time as you do in people who you must know are beyond help.

I was just watching the high jump at the world champs on TV.
Does not look like to me that these guys lift much. They probably do heaps of pylometric work, and anything in the gym would be more for injury prevention.

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[quote]Ramo wrote:
Chris Colucci, god bless you but I can’t begin to imagine what moves you to invest as much time as you do in people who you must know are beyond help.[/quote]
Ha, thanks man. It’s a gift and a curse. :wink: I’m just trying to help in general, but this kid in particular has had a bunch of threads around here since September. At this point, I just need to make sure he gets something out of it all, one way or the other.

[quote]theBird wrote:
I was just watching the high jump at the world champs on TV.
Does not look like to me that these guys lift much.[/quote]
Every sport will have something like an ideal build. I just checked some stats and it seems like most top level jumpers are 6’0" or taller and weigh in the 150-170 range, with guys 6’3" and up getting into the 170s-180s, tops.

From this perspective, treating the high jump almost like a “weight class-sport” would probably be appropriate. But the OP is nowhere near the point where that’s remotely an issue, since we’re still in the foundation-building stage.

Seriously disagree. Injury prevention should always be on the radar for athletes, of course, but a well-designed weight training plan is pretty much essential for maximum sports performance in the 21st century.

It’s entirely possible to train for strength/speed/power without increasing size. Powerlifters and Olympic lifters do it all the time. Getting a bodyweight power clean will do as much, if not more, for his high jump as plyo work could.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Seriously disagree. Injury prevention should always be on the radar for athletes, of course, but a well-designed weight training plan is pretty much essential for maximum sports performance in the 21st century.

It’s entirely possible to train for strength/speed/power without increasing size. Powerlifters and Olympic lifters do it all the time. Getting a bodyweight power clean will do as much, if not more, for his high jump as plyo work could.[/quote]

You may have a point, but in reality a lot of high level athletes don’t train like the way we think they do. I think we need to get a high jump coach in to resolve this.

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[quote]theBird wrote:
You may have a point, but in reality a lot of high level athletes don’t train like the way we think they do. I think we need to get a high jump coach in to resolve this.[/quote]
He already asked his track coach for advice. His coach suggested he lift three days a week on a full body plan and run/jump three days a week.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]theBird wrote:
You may have a point, but in reality a lot of high level athletes don’t train like the way we think they do. I think we need to get a high jump coach in to resolve this.[/quote]
He already asked his track coach for advice. His coach suggested he lift three days a week on a full body plan and run/jump three days a week.[/quote]
True.

But from the sounds of things, his coach has not prescribed a program and probably thinks he is doing a few sets of push-ups, pull-ups and some curls.

What I was saying is that I would like to hear from a higher level high jump coach on what is expected from a higher level high jump athlete in the weight room.

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…this guy again

Dude, just do strong lifts (start with an empty bar) until you are consistent at it and you have met the criteria for coming off it.

Until you can manage that, you have no business going onto other plans (swap the row or bench for a clean, forget about your curl ambitions - how is that going to help you jump?)

Add in some vertical/broad jumps (6x2) and throws/slams and you’re golden.

[quote]tsantos wrote:
forget about your curl ambitions - how is that going to help you jump?[/quote]

90%+ of every sprinters and jumpers weight training program I’ve ever seen focused on squats, cleans, benching, pullups and a ton of ab work. Seriously, a crazy amount of ab work. Seems to me if you wanted to get more explosive you’d spend more time building up horsepower and less time creating new threads asking redundant questions.

Really? I’m a bit surprised on the ab work. Abs are stabilizing the body as it moves, so I’m not surprised that its there. But that its a focus is a bit of a surprise. They already get so much work from sprinting itself…

[quote]Jeetkunedomaster wrote:
Really? I’m a bit surprised on the ab work. Abs are stabilizing the body as it moves, so I’m not surprised that its there. But that its a focus is a bit of a surprise. They already get so much work from sprinting itself…[/quote]

You have to keep in mind, they don’t sprint to train their abs better. They train their abs so that they can sprint better. You have to get the ends and the means sorted out in training, and keep your eye on the prize the entire time.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Jeetkunedomaster wrote:
Really? I’m a bit surprised on the ab work. Abs are stabilizing the body as it moves, so I’m not surprised that its there. But that its a focus is a bit of a surprise. They already get so much work from sprinting itself…[/quote]

You have to keep in mind, they don’t sprint to train their abs better. They train their abs so that they can sprint better. You have to get the ends and the means sorted out in training, and keep your eye on the prize the entire time.[/quote]

Exactly. I’m not saying that all programs do this, or that it’s optimal, or even that I agree with it. Just what I’ve seen. Things like 500 total reps on decline situps, or 500 total on sprinter situps, things like that. These were done either after the weightroom or after the track.