T Nation

5x5 at 83% of 1RM Possible?


#1

As the title already says, is it possible to do 5x5 at 83% of your 1RM? Just wanted to know because I did 5x5 with 140 kg on squats couple weeks ago but today I failed to do 170 kg for a 1RM and after that attempt I even failed to do 165 kg…

I hope you guys can share your experience.


#2

It sounds like it is possible; as you just did it.


#3

I agree. You doing it strongly indicates its possibility.

Don’t go by the calculators, they’re just another tool and an unreliable one at best unless you’re looking at a set of three or less in my experience. Your max single is the heaviest single you actually lift. If it goes up, you’re stronger. If you’re increasing how much you can do for a set of five, you’re getting stronger. If increase how many reps you can do at X weight in a set, you’re getting stronger.


#4

The thing is that in the past I don’t think I would be able to do it at that percentage and I Always used a percentage based program so it kinda fucks up my program a bit. Or maybe it wasn’t my day but I didn’t really felt week today tho…


#5

So you fucked up your weight lifting program by lifting too much weight?


#6

Nah we Always lift at 50% of our 1RM. Dunno what you are talking about.


#7

I was asking because you said it fucked up your program a bit in the post you just wrote. Were you looking for help with a solution to that, or did you just want to know if the feat you recently performed was possible?


#8

No, you didn’t read it correctly. I said that now that i’m able to do 5x5 at a higher percentage than I used to instead of 80% which kinda fucks up the program if it was usually programmed at 80%. You see? Then I said that it also could had been a bad day but I doubt that.


#9

Not really, but that’s my problem, not yours. There’s obviously important nuances to your approach I don’t understand.

Good luck!


#10

Using the weight you can do 5x5 with to determine a 1rm seems kind of backwards. If you want to accurately test your 1rm, you need to peak properly for it.


#11

What reps were you working with in the weeks leading up to the max attempt if you weren’t training anything lower than 5 that would be your problem


#12

yeah if 5x5 weight has gone up then you have pretty much got overall stronger including 1RM.

As youve found out the difference between 5x5 training weight and actual 1RM varies a lot between individuals and those max calculators are just a loose guide. will even change with training age


#13

@Vincent Yeah I was thinking this today as well. I didn’t do any real peaking so that might explain why my volume stuff didn’t translated well into a higher percentage weight. While I was able to do 5x5 at a " higher percentage " I know in the past I wouldn’t be able to do 5x5 at 83% of my 1RM. I was doing 3x8 and 4x6 and 5x5 and then 2-3 weeks before I tested I went to 5x4 and 3x3 but I don’t I don’t think it was enough to translate all of that volume into a big 1RM because they weren’t above 90%. Usually I didn’t had to think much about it because in my previous program, peaking was already build into it.


#14

I guess I wasn’t peaked for it properly.


#15

Depeds on the individuals muscle fiber type, CNS recruitmenet efficiency, experience, technique, training style, etc.

Some time ago Tom Platz and Fred Hatfield had a friendly squat competition. Platz squatted 525 for 23 reps and Hatfield squatted the same weight for 11 reps. However Hatfield’s max that day was 855 vs. Platz who maxed out at 765.

Get the point? Both men ridicuously strong, but different.


#16

But I know 5 months ago and all the other months of lifting I know I couldn’t pull it off so I guess it’s the shitty peaking which I never thought would be that big of a difference.