T Nation

5x Bodyweight Deadlift and Muscle Mass


#1

Well i was thinking about it. How is it possible that someone deadlift 4 or even 5 times his bodyweight? I have read from a lifter (Lamar Gant) who deadlifter 300 kg ( 661 lbs) at a bodyweight of 60kg ( 132 lbs).

"When it comes to producing a high level of strength, I see four main applications:

MUSCLE STRENGTH: the amount of force that a specific muscle can produce; this is highly correlated with the muscle's cross-section (muscle mass or volume) "

A quote from CT out of "QUADRUPLE STRENGTH LAYERS".

It looks like that muscle mass or volume isnt that important for strenght? His muscle mass / volume cant be that high/ much... he only weights 60kg.... ( he is 1.6m high)
Did he only trained for strenght or how did he got his sick relative strengh ? :open_mouth:


#2

[quote]Akidara wrote:
Well i was thinking about it. How is it possible that someone deadlift 4 or even 5 times his bodyweight? I have read from a lifter (Lamar Gant) who deadlifter 300 kg ( 661 lbs) at a bodyweight of 60kg ( 132 lbs).

"When it comes to producing a high level of strength, I see four main applications:

MUSCLE STRENGTH: the amount of force that a specific muscle can produce; this is highly correlated with the muscle’s cross-section (muscle mass or volume) "

A quote from CT out of “QUADRUPLE STRENGTH LAYERS”.

It looks like that muscle mass or volume isnt that important for strenght? His muscle mass / volume cant be that high/ much… he only weights 60kg… ( he is 1.6m high)
Did he only trained for strenght or how did he got his sick relative strengh ? :open_mouth: [/quote]

Well, his arms hanging slack do pretty much come down to kneesâ?¦that probably has something to do with it


#3

[quote]Young33 wrote:

[quote]Akidara wrote:
Well i was thinking about it. How is it possible that someone deadlift 4 or even 5 times his bodyweight? I have read from a lifter (Lamar Gant) who deadlifter 300 kg ( 661 lbs) at a bodyweight of 60kg ( 132 lbs).

"When it comes to producing a high level of strength, I see four main applications:

MUSCLE STRENGTH: the amount of force that a specific muscle can produce; this is highly correlated with the muscle’s cross-section (muscle mass or volume) "

A quote from CT out of “QUADRUPLE STRENGTH LAYERS”.

It looks like that muscle mass or volume isnt that important for strenght? His muscle mass / volume cant be that high/ much… he only weights 60kg… ( he is 1.6m high)
Did he only trained for strenght or how did he got his sick relative strengh ? :open_mouth: [/quote]

Well, his arms hanging slack do pretty much come down to kneesâ?¦that probably has something to do with it

[/quote]

That is correct. Just look at Bob Peoples… same thing. When standing up straight his hands almost came down to his knees. Leverages play AT LEAST as big a role in the deadlift as muscle mass.


#4

In addition to his arms, note that he also had scoliosis. As the weight on the bar increased, he got shorter.

How his spine didn’t plain snap is as much a testament to his strength as his ability to deadlift that much.


#5

If he trained it I wonder how much manute bol could DL, he was 7’7" with an 8’6" wingspan.


#6

[quote]Young33 wrote:
If he trained it I wonder how much manute bol could DL, he was 7’7" with an 8’6" wingspan.[/quote]

Yeah, but he was so frail that he could break in half.

But some very tall guys have deadlifting a lot of weight. Wilt Chamberlain was a VERY strong deadlifter… but he was built on a big, not just tall, frame.


#7

[quote]Young33 wrote:
If he trained it I wonder how much manute bol could DL, he was 7’7" with an 8’6" wingspan.[/quote]

When he was drafted out of the University of Bridgeport, Manute was listed at 7’7", 185. Not the kind of frame on which you build much strength, irrespective of skeletal leverage.


#8

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Young33 wrote:
If he trained it I wonder how much manute bol could DL, he was 7’7" with an 8’6" wingspan.[/quote]

Yeah, but he was so frail that he could break in half.

But some very tall guys have deadlifting a lot of weight. Wilt Chamberlain was a VERY strong deadlifter… but he was built on a big, not just tall, frame.[/quote]

Haha, that is definitely true.

He’s almost creepy looking at him from a distance. He’s so damn dark. It’s like this giant shadows with freakishly long limbs


#9

interesting this basketball player :open_mouth: hahaha

it looks like the big lifts arent always a measuring tool for streght, when they have suitable leverages.

thanks for your answers all :slight_smile:


#10

[quote]Akidara wrote:
interesting this basketball player :open_mouth: hahaha

it looks like the big lifts arent always a measuring tool for streght, when they have suitable leverages.

thanks for your answers all :)[/quote]

There is a difference between:

  1. muscle strength (the actual capacity of an individual muscle to produce force)

  2. movement strength (the amount of weight one can lift from point A to point B in a specific motor pattern)

  3. positional strength (the capacity to be solid in a given body position/posture)

For 2 and 3, muscle strength is not the only contributing factor… leverage, neural efficiency and technique play a big role.

For example I have short arms/legs and a long torso… squats and bench press are easy for me because I have a good leverage for them. But the deadlift is horrible because I have the worst leverage for it… heck at my peak strength I was FRONT squatting almost as much as I was deadlifting and I was back squatting more than I was deadlifting… and we’re talking about a full squat without any powerlifting gear. My legs and back were strong, but my leverages were really bad to apply that strength in the deadlift.


#11

Thanks for all your answers. I understand it now much better.


#12

One thing that gets left out in this discussion is tendon insertion points. Since all muscle action is happening across a lever, even a couple of millimeters can make a huge difference on the force produced on the end of the lever.


#13

Yes, tendon insertion points can make a real difference.

If I am not mistaken, in addition to affecting leverage, tension insertion points also help determine the overall size of the muscle. The closer an insertion is to the joint, the larger the potential size of the muscle. It’s just one factor among many in hypertrophy and strength, but a factor nonetheless.