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505 Deadlift Attempt - What Went Wrong?

#1

Hello guys.

So I decided to try beat my personal record what is 485 lbs in conventional style. I attempted 505 lbs in sumo, what I train for a month. Please, be critique as hell and tell me what went wrong? I also beated my Squat PR two days ago, but it felt easy.

#2

Get your hips lower. Get stronger.

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#3

Long term implementing the technique tweaks from your other thread. In the vid looks like it just wasn’t there on the day. Get stronger and keep building

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#4

Are you hook gripping or double overhand?

Looks like your grip just gave out and or you bailed as soon as it got “hard”

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#5

Thank you for answering. Maybe it just wasn’t that day.

corstijeir it is a hook grip, if I could describe how it felt it would be like “och shit, it’s heavy” and I put it down. Grip wasn’t a issue in my opinion.

By the way, I would like to ask about RPE method. If for example I set my training day to do 4 sets of 6 at RPE 8, which is about 79% of 1 RM and first set felt much easier than RPE 8, then I simply recalculate estamined 1RM for that day and pick a higher weight equal to this? I mean…

1 set - 6 x 345 but felt like I have more than 2 reps in a tank so I simply add weight and continue my workout:
2, 3, 4 set - 6 x 365 for example?

Same if it felt too heavy.

#6

There 5 parts to this easy to find the others in related videos below this one.

Sumo deadlifts are different and require more patience off the floor. Watch these and learn it, implement it and your technique should be better.

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#7

This. Commit to the lift. It was moving.

2 Likes
#8

RPE is rate of perceived effort. IF you’re supposed to do 4 sets of 6 and they feel super easy then you can easily up the weight used.

Back down if heavy. So yes- you’ve got it basically figured out.

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#9

You either started with the bar too close to your shins, or you let your hips raise too much. Either way, notice how as soon as you start pulling the bar rolls forward, then once it breaks the floor it starts swinging back towards you. All that will really screw with your stability and make if feel heavier than it really is. The bar never stopped moving up until you let go, which tells me you have the strength for it.

Next time you pull heavy maybe work up to something in the 450-475 lb range, set up a camera from the side so you can see your bar path, and work on finding the exact starting position that will allow you to pull in a vertical line straight up throughout the entire pull. There is a nice bar path tracking app, BarSense I think is the name, that does a good job of helping visualize this.

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#10

Thanks for advices and cues. One more thing, how to progress on RPE? I mean, is there anything to keep in mind? For example monthly mesocycle with different RPE? For instance:

Week 1 - RPE 7
Week 2 - RPE 8
Week 3 - RPE 9
Week 4 - weight from week 1 but slightly more, like 5 pounds?

@tasty_nate I can see what you mean. The barbell was out of balance.

#11
  1. Bar was too far out from the shins
  2. Hips were closed, making it a wide stance conventional. There’s a Dave Tate podcast where Dan Green discusses technique for opening and strengthening the hips. Watch it