T Nation

44 Year Old Looking for Feed Back

[quote]Fplanner wrote:
What is you diet like? What about your Peri-workout nutrition protocol? [/quote]

Don’t really have one right now. What would you recommend? Someone else mentioned post-workout protocal. Whould I want to do both?

[quote]Kairiki wrote:
Hi…welcome to the forums…have you ever considered the 5 x 5 workout scheme?[/quote]

What would that protocal look like for a given week?

Thanks for the welcome. Wish I had found this place years ago.

Re diet: I recommend a carb-cycling approach. You can tailor it to your goals (increase muscle, lose fat, etc). I like this article:

Re training: I think you need to train more frequently. Consider a 3 on, 1 off routine with your current bodypart splits; ie, Day 1 pull, Day 2 legs, Day 3 push, Day 4 off, then repeat. (Note I moved your Leg day between the two upper-body days.) This way you’re working everything once every 4 days, not every 7 as now. If you find you’re not fully recovered, you can throw an extra rest day in there to make it an ‘every 5 day’ regimen.

I would drop the deadlifts for now, as they don’t mesh well with your preferred split.

We can talk about tweaking your exercises (you’re doing too much of some things, not enough of others in my opinion). However, moreso than any specific exercises, training intensity is the key to getting bigger. Thus, you need to start adding 1-2 forced reps (the best intensity-increaser IMHO) to the majority of your post-warm-up sets. If no one is available to spot you, do dropped sets, or work on machines that allow you to force-rep yourself.

So, three big changes:

  1. proper diet
  2. more frequent workouts
  3. more intense workouts

Do these, and the results you seek are sure to follow.

I don’t think you need to carb cycle or do anything more complicated than simply being consistent with your intake. You make the comment that your daily macros probably aren’t consistent enough to calculate. Your first step before you do anything is to get that changed.

Be consistent in your eating. Eating the same thing everyday is boring but works well. It sounds like you need to have your meals planned out ahead of time. Do that. Getting enough calories in is way more important than peri-workout nutrition or timing when you get your carbs. You’re simply trying to gain muscle right? Not hit the stage?

How consistent are you with your training? Do you hit the gym routinely and consistently or do you miss days here and there? That’s going to make a big difference too. I’m of the opinion that you can use any plan at first whether it’s 5*5, 5,3,1, HP Mass, etc.

If you believe in the program then you’ll put your all into it and you’ll make gains. If you don’t believe in it and don’t stick to it then you won’t. I’d rather have a 70% good plan that is given 100% than a 100% good plan that is stuck to 70% of the time.

No need to make this complicated. You need to be consistent, have a plan, and stick to that plan. Keep your plan simple for now because you want to be able to stick with it. Start a training log and put in your goals, your schedule, and your plan to hit those goals.

Don’t change things up all the time. Everyone has an opinion on what works best so it’s easy to get lost in it all. You’re a beginner (like I am) so all you need to do is keep it simple and be consistent.

Best of luck.

james

[quote]EyeDentist wrote:

Re training: I think you need to train more frequently. Consider a 3 on, 1 off routine with your current bodypart splits; ie, Day 1 pull, Day 2 legs, Day 3 push, Day 4 off, then repeat. (Note I moved your Leg day between the two upper-body days.) This way you’re working everything once every 4 days, not every 7 as now. If you find you’re not fully recovered, you can throw an extra rest day in there to make it an ‘every 5 day’ regimen.

I would drop the deadlifts for now, as they don’t mesh well with your preferred split.

We can talk about tweaking your exercises (you’re doing too much of some things, not enough of others in my opinion). However, moreso than any specific exercises, training intensity is the key to getting bigger. Thus, you need to start adding 1-2 forced reps (the best intensity-increaser IMHO) to the majority of your post-warm-up sets. If no one is available to spot you, do dropped sets, or work on machines that allow you to force-rep yourself.

.[/quote]

Thanks for the input! Could you give me some more input on the exersices/sets/reps for the Pull/LEGS/Push. Just looking for a starting place.

Thanks for the suggestion on the forced reps.

[quote]atypical1 wrote:
How consistent are you with your training? Do you hit the gym routinely and consistently or do you miss days here and there? That’s going to make a big difference too. I’m of the opinion that you can use any plan at first whether it’s 5*5, 5,3,1, HP Mass, etc.

No need to make this complicated. You need to be consistent, have a plan, and stick to that plan. Keep your plan simple for now because you want to be able to stick with it. Start a training log and put in your goals, your schedule, and your plan to hit those goals.

Don’t change things up all the time. Everyone has an opinion on what works best so it’s easy to get lost in it all. You’re a beginner (like I am) so all you need to do is keep it simple and be consistent.

james[/quote]

Thanks for the input. I’m more of a planner. Any input on a consitat meal plan?

Here’s a good place to start. You’re going to have to do a bit of research on your own though.

You could also try precision nutrition for some ideas. I guess my point is that you simply need to figure out how many calories you need and make sure you eat it. It’s going to require some work on your part though and unless you’re willing to put that work in (both in research and sticking to it) then you’re not going to make any gains.

I would also spend some time reading a few of the logs here for ideas.

james

[quote]TMan96 wrote:

[quote]Kairiki wrote:
Hi…welcome to the forums…have you ever considered the 5 x 5 workout scheme?[/quote]

What would that protocol look like for a given week?

Thanks for the welcome. Wish I had found this place years ago.[/quote]

My pleasure…I hope you don’t get information overload at all. Remember the principle of individual differences. The best 5 x 5 protocol I have found is by going to stronglifts.com or signing up on their Facebook page…you will get a PDF that outlines the workouts.

Tman96,

Welcome aboard! At the risk of reposting, I have found a lot of very good information on nutrition and programs in the stickies at the front of the Beginners Forum:

Your issues seem to be very similar to others who post here, and hopefully that information is helpful. Most of their audience are not beginners, rather people who have hit a wall or for the first time have seen their progress plateau. There is more information here than you can shake a stick at, so do follow as many of the links as time allows. The first five responses to most posts in the beginners section are a variation of, “What EXACTLY did you eat today?”

OK, here’s what I would suggest…

DAY 1: PULL (and abs)
Back:

  1. Wide-grip pulldowns–5 sets
  2. Some sort of two-handed row (seated cable rows, T-bar rows, barbell rows, etc)–5 sets

Biceps: Barbell curls (straight or EZ)–5 sets

Abs: Crunches–as many as you can in 5 minutes

DAY 2: LEGS
Quads/hammies:

  1. Squats–5 sets
  2. Leg presses (anything except hack squats)–5 sets
    Calves: Some sort of straight-leg calf raises–5 sets

DAY 3: PUSH (and abs)
Chest:

  1. Incline (preferably ~30o) barbell presses–5 sets
  2. Flys (dumbbell, pec deck, etc)–5 sets

Shoulders: Lateral raises (preferably with dumbbells, but machine is OK)–5 sets

Triceps: Close-grip flat bench using an EZ curl bar (grip it like you’re doing skull crushers, but just bench with it)–5 sets

Abs: Hanging knee raises–as many as you can in 5 minutes

DAY 4: REST (light cardio OK)

General guidelines:
–Do 8-15 reps per set. If you can’t get 8, the weight was too heavy; if you can get >15, it was too light. In either case, adjust the weight accordingly next time.
–For each exercise, do as many warm-up sets as you need. Once you’re warmed up, do your first set with the heaviest weight you can handle for that exercise (remember, you have to get at least 8 reps). For each subsequent set, drop the weight only as much as you need to get at least 8 reps. (If you think you can get 8+ reps with the same weight, don’t lower it at all).
–Whenever possible, have someone assist you through 1-2 forced reps per set.
–Rest ~1 minute between sets for everything except squats & leg press, for which you should rest 2-3 minutes.
–Get stronger! Keep track of the weight/reps you’re able to do on the first set of each exercise, and do your level best to beat it every workout. (On the ab work, you HAVE to set a record every single workout until you’re able to do 500 crunches on crunch day, and 200 knee raises on that day)
–Re the ab work…the goal is to do as many as you can in 5 minutes. Take as many mini-breaks as you need, but be sure to get at least one more rep than you did in the previous w/o.

I’d say that’s enough to get you started. Let me know what questions you have.

What do you pressing, deadlift and squat numbers look like? because I don’t think we can give you any real advice until we know where you are right now? Also what is your number one goal from lifting. Mass? Strength? Fat Loss?

Can’t build a program without knowing what you are shooting for.

Off the cuff though it seems really silly to have two upper body days but only one lower body. The wheels can take more work than the upper body so why work them less?

Unless theres a time constraint you should have at least one lower day for evry upper day and a conditioning day would probably be a good idea as well.

TMan, JoeGood makes a very good point–your training should be dictated by your goals. The program I outlined above assumes your primary goal is to improve your physique’s aesthetics; ie, that you want to look bigger and more muscular than you do now. If that assumption was incorrect–if your goals are primarily strength oriented; ie, if you want to become a powerlifter and/or strongman competitor–then you should NOT follow the plan I laid out above, and instead seek input from among the many excellent powerlifters/strongman athletes here on TN.

As someone pointed out earlier, conflicting responses are inevitable when you ask a large group of people for advice. When faced with conflicting opinions, the dilemma is deciding whose advice (if any) to follow. In that regard, I would suggest you look to people who have had success in achieving what you’d like to achieve. So if you want to become a successful powerlifter, listen to the successful powerlifters. If you want to improve your aesthetics, listen to those who have had some success in that regard. This is common sense, IMHO. Good luck.

Buy 5/3/1 by Jim Wendler and do what it tells you to do re: diet, training, and attitude. You will be bigger and stronger this time next year if you do.

Here’s the link to the guy I mentioned:

although to be honest most of the beginners’ logs tend to be the same thing:

  1. someone asks “How do I get big/strong, help me???”
  2. people respond “Didn’t you read any of the stickies?”
  3. he gives some information about diet / training / condition
  4. guys who grow just looking at a barbell can’t figure out why he’s having so much trouble and finally accuse him of being a wuss.

Anyway. As EyeDentist points out, asking for general info can often bring in too much. It can be confusing, even conflicting. Let’s take a deep breath and start over:

  1. If you’re unhappy now, then workout / diet / recovery must change.
  2. Your T is at a good level, so that’s not the problem.
  3. My first guess is that you need to start eating a LOT more meat, plus protein shakes.
  4. What weights can you currently lift? That can clue us in to your present condition.

[quote]cavalier wrote:
Here’s the link to the guy I mentioned:

although to be honest most of the beginners’ logs tend to be the same thing:

  1. someone asks “How do I get big/strong, help me???”
  2. people respond “Didn’t you read any of the stickies?”
  3. he gives some information about diet / training / condition
  4. guys who grow just looking at a barbell can’t figure out why he’s having so much trouble and finally accuse him of being a wuss.

Anyway. As EyeDentist points out, asking for general info can often bring in too much. It can be confusing, even conflicting. Let’s take a deep breath and start over:

  1. If you’re unhappy now, then workout / diet / recovery must change.
  2. Your T is at a good level, so that’s not the problem.
  3. My first guess is that you need to start eating a LOT more meat, plus protein shakes.
  4. What weights can you currently lift? That can clue us in to your present condition.[/quote]

Aye Cav…you are right on the money. Don’t over-analyze, TMan. Just experiment and see what is best for you.

[quote]EyeDentist wrote:
TMan, JoeGood makes a very good point–your training should be dictated by your goals. The program I outlined above assumes your primary goal is to improve your physique’s aesthetics; ie, that you want to look bigger and more muscular than you do now. If that assumption was incorrect–if your goals are primarily strength oriented; ie, if you want to become a powerlifter and/or strongman competitor–then you should NOT follow the plan I laid out above, and instead seek input from among the many excellent powerlifters/strongman athletes here on TN.

As someone pointed out earlier, conflicting responses are inevitable when you ask a large group of people for advice. When faced with conflicting opinions, the dilemma is deciding whose advice (if any) to follow. In that regard, I would suggest you look to people who have had success in achieving what you’d like to achieve. So if you want to become a successful powerlifter, listen to the successful powerlifters. If you want to improve your aesthetics, listen to those who have had some success in that regard. This is common sense, IMHO. Good luck.[/quote]

EyeDentist thanks for the input and workout outline. I plan to start following those protocals tomorrow. Your assumption is correct, my goal is aesthetic in nature.

[quote]Kairiki wrote:

[quote]TMan96 wrote:

[quote]Kairiki wrote:
Hi…welcome to the forums…have you ever considered the 5 x 5 workout scheme?[/quote]

What would that protocol look like for a given week?

Thanks for the welcome. Wish I had found this place years ago.[/quote]

My pleasure…I hope you don’t get information overload at all. Remember the principle of individual differences. The best 5 x 5 protocol I have found is by going to stronglifts.com or signing up on their Facebook page…you will get a PDF that outlines the workouts.
[/quote]

Kairiki Thanks for the info on Stronlifts.com. Great site. Very simiple and straight forward. I paln on trying to follow the outline of the nutrition protocal they have.

[quote]TMan96 wrote:

[quote]Kairiki wrote:

[quote]TMan96 wrote:

[quote]Kairiki wrote:
Hi…welcome to the forums…have you ever considered the 5 x 5 workout scheme?[/quote]

What would that protocol look like for a given week?

Thanks for the welcome. Wish I had found this place years ago.[/quote]

My pleasure…I hope you don’t get information overload at all. Remember the principle of individual differences. The best 5 x 5 protocol I have found is by going to stronglifts.com or signing up on their Facebook page…you will get a PDF that outlines the workouts.
[/quote]

Kairiki Thanks for the info on Stronlifts.com. Great site. Very simiple and straight forward. I paln on trying to follow the outline of the nutrition protocal they have.
[/quote]

Always a pleasure. :slight_smile:

[quote]TMan96 wrote:

[quote]EyeDentist wrote:
TMan, JoeGood makes a very good point–your training should be dictated by your goals. The program I outlined above assumes your primary goal is to improve your physique’s aesthetics; ie, that you want to look bigger and more muscular than you do now. If that assumption was incorrect–if your goals are primarily strength oriented; ie, if you want to become a powerlifter and/or strongman competitor–then you should NOT follow the plan I laid out above, and instead seek input from among the many excellent powerlifters/strongman athletes here on TN.

As someone pointed out earlier, conflicting responses are inevitable when you ask a large group of people for advice. When faced with conflicting opinions, the dilemma is deciding whose advice (if any) to follow. In that regard, I would suggest you look to people who have had success in achieving what you’d like to achieve. So if you want to become a successful powerlifter, listen to the successful powerlifters. If you want to improve your aesthetics, listen to those who have had some success in that regard. This is common sense, IMHO. Good luck.[/quote]

EyeDentist thanks for the input and workout outline. I plan to start following those protocals tomorrow. Your assumption is correct, my goal is aesthetic in nature.[/quote]

Happy to help, and best of luck to you.

this is purely shooting from the hip, but I think you have too much volume. I mean who knows what your genetics are like etc etc… But are you gaining strength with your workouts? Also for u maybe just 2 light cardio days for 20 to 30 minutes at no more than 70% of maximum heart rate would be enough. Also are you eating enough to support new muscle growth?

Of course there has been a ton of stuff on the “window of opportunity” around a weight training session. Protein and fast carbs immediately after a workout to stop the muscle breakdown and to hopefully start muscle synthesis.
Also are you resting long enough between sets? usually 3 to 5 minutes is needed. You also have to see how well you recover from a workout, that would tell you something about your ability to adapt to the demands you are making on your body.