40+ & Gaining Muscle?

[quote]randman wrote:
Dude, this is an unbelievable amount of volume. You’re doing well over 150 totals reps on legs alone. Do you do this type of volume all of the time? If so, how the hell do you keep from burning out? If I followed this program, I would be toast in less than 3 weeks.[/quote]

I know; it’s a sick routine! As I said, it’s not for beginners or the faint of heart. You have to be in pretty descent condition before you attempt this program. Even if you are in great condition it takes about 3 weeks for your body to adjust to it. Don’t stay on it for more than 6 weeks or you will quickly wind up over-training. Get plenty of rest and be eating and supplementing right or it will lay you to waste.

When I train like this I get big and cut. Obviously I don’t do any cardio while on it other than warm up.

I only cycle on this routine about 3 X a year for 6 weeks at a time. When I come off of it and switch back to a more moderate routine my strength and size go through the roof.

Believe it or not it only takes me about an hour to an hour and 15 mins depending on the muscle group to get through it.

We geezers still got it baby!

Have fun with it,

Ass Buster

Assbuster -

You are my hero.

I didn’t start to fill out in the upper body until i was in my late 30s. I did not BP 400 until i was 38, then hit 500 at 42, and just hit 545 and a 1/2 inch from lockout 551 at 43. I anticipate 600 by 45, all drug free and single ply. I got beat on formula last year in a DL meet by an 80 year old who pulled 400@ 148ish! The Russians (Training of a Weightlifter-Robert Roman) thought as you got past your mid 30s you needed to drop your reps and total volume, and i have. Hydration and maintaining range of motion is key. Gluco/chondroitin better then NSAIs! Injuries don’t heal as fast. Actually have to do some cardio.

Worth it all!

Tip you off, in my mid 50’s I am gaining and doing it naturally. This past May I had my best bench in competition in over 4 years. I came back from an arm problem and got stronger and am ready to train for my next meet. Also deadlift and squat both getting bigger hitting pr in squat.

Keep it up, getting old is not for sissies damn it.

[quote]throttle132 wrote:
Like I said in my first post, I have gained size and strength in my 40’s. Am currently 44, 5’8", 185 - 190 lbs @~11% bf. I do train hard, heavy, consistently, and eat properly via the general T-Nation accepted norms and only use protein powder, creatine and occasional cycles of Alpha Male as supps. I’m confident my strength gains can continue to rise but will/can the muscle continue to be added? I purposely bulked up to 198 lbs. this past winter and got stronger, added muscle mass and yes…some fat… too much for my tastes. Didn’t like the extra fat so I have peeled it off this spring without any noticeable strength losses.

I dumbbell flat press 12 x 3’s & 7 x 4’s with 105’s. I deadlift (with straps) 10 x 3’s @ 385 - 410 lbs and 5 x 5’s @ 375 & a 1RM of 430. I squat 10 x 3’s and 5 x 5’s in the high 200’s and low 300’s. I chin 10 x 3’s with a 55 lbs. dumbbell and a 1RM with a 70. With just bodyweight I can crank out ~12 - 15. Dips, same set rep scheme with a 90 and doubles and triples with a 105. I workout alone in my home gym next to the barn 30 miles from the nearest town. I’ve been told on a number of occasions I look mid 30’s.

However, I consider my best accomplishment to be that I have convinced my 5’4", 110 lbs. 40 year old wife to lift consistently, heavy, and with basic compound movements…and she has been told many times that she looks late 20’s and still gets carded at clubs from time to time. She gets waaaaay more muscularity compliments than I do! The looks and whistles she gets at the bar, club, beach, Walmart or wherever are frequent and I’m at the age where I get a big kick out of it. [/quote]

I am 41 and have been training since age 14. Couple of thoughts.

  1. Its more mental than ever. I can remember when I was a boy and was watching the Carson show one night-this was in the mid 1970’s. They had a guy on the show who was 65 and had run and completed the Boston Marathon-not a real fast time or anything, but was national news because he had completed it. 30 years later, people in their 70’s and 80’s who run marathons are a dime a dozen. The paradigm of what is old had changed.

  2. I agree with lower reps and shorter workouts as one ages.

  3. Warm-Up is essential-I never warmed up when I competed, ok, I pretended to and I guess I did later in my contest years, but normally it was a 2 minute ritual–now its mandatory

  4. Dont rely on drugs on a long term basis. The U.S. is the most medicated nation in the world-we take 68% of all of the drugs on Earth. Drugs have a place and a purpose, but to rely on them to “give us health” is a huge mistake.

  5. Engage in recreational activities that improve your conditioning. I hate to run-but will drop everything to go and play a game of football, which is basically running and controlled fighting, make a game out of it.

  6. Dont hang out with your peers who “act their age”, they will poison your thought process

  7. Heavy up on the essential minerals

  8. Continue to set written goals, once you get in the 'I will just maintain what I have" mode, you are on steep path downhill

good posts everyone

I too believe that the desire/drive/hard work aspect is the key to success in any endeavor, not just lifting. This is especially true for the “over 40” crowd which typically have more life stressors and must balance many more responsibilities competing for that precious resource, time. I am grateful for the resources on this site which allow me to easily select among training programs and diets which target my current goals rather than spend the time and effort to research and devise my own.

I am curious to know the training age that goes along with these motivating success stories. Having started at age 41 and only lifting 2.5 years, I am still in pursuit of the 300/400/500 range for BP/SQ/DL. Although I have gained ~30 lbs of LBM and doubled many of my lifts, I am more pleased that my health and body composition are improving while most people around me in my age bracket are severely declining.

Although I have know idea how long it will take to reach my goal, I really don’t care because my satisfaction comes at the completion of every workout.

vic

[quote]!vic wrote:

Although I have know idea how long it will take to reach my goal, I really don’t care because my satisfaction comes at the completion of every workout.

vic[/quote]

It’s the journey rather than the destination. Enjoy the ride. Set goals daily, weekly, monthly and longer term. Write them down. Go to the gym with a purpose every training day. Push yourself every workout to get one more rep than you did last time or 5 more pounds. If you push yourself every workout to do better you will continue to make progress at any age.

I see a lot guys my age and younger who seem to come to the gym just to have someone to talk to. I’m there for a reason, not to socialize. I will chat occasionally either before or after my workout but during, I keep it brief if at all. I hear the chatty cats always complaining about not making progress and getting too old, blah, blah, blah. I say shut up and train.

Ass Buster

[quote]assbuster wrote:
!vic wrote:

Although I have know idea how long it will take to reach my goal, I really don’t care because my satisfaction comes at the completion of every workout.

vic

It’s the journey rather than the destination. Enjoy the ride. Set goals daily, weekly, monthly and longer term. Write them down. Go to the gym with a purpose every training day. Push yourself every workout to get one more rep than you did last time or 5 more pounds. If you push yourself every workout to do better you will continue to make progress at any age.

I see a lot guys my age and younger who seem to come to the gym just to have someone to talk to. I’m there for a reason, not to socialize. I will chat occasionally either before or after my workout but during, I keep it brief if at all. I hear the chatty cats always complaining about not making progress and getting too old, blah, blah, blah. I say shut up and train.

Ass Buster[/quote]

Very wise words indeed - I would hazzard a guess that with that attitude you are very successful in life as well. The words you have said are the keys to success in anything one does in life. Keep it up!!!

Started in my late 30s (but I’m not sure the pre-T-Mag years should count); now 46 and still making gains in LBM and strength. I, too, have asked myself recently how long I can keep this up, but I can’t really imagine letting myself reach the “time to just maintain because I’m old now” stage.

Terrific thread.

Syd Ward, New Zealander, age 73 years young… and still going strong!!

http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3283656a10,00.html

It really is great hearing each others’ stats, routines, diets, philosophy, etc. It is not meant to be a bragfest and it hasn’t! It has been very motivating, at least to me! Thanks, guys and keep on posting! Wanna hear more!

[quote]throttle132 wrote:
It really is great hearing each others’ stats, routines, diets, philosophy, etc. It is not meant to be a bragfest and it hasn’t! It has been very motivating, at least to me! Thanks, guys and keep on posting! Wanna hear more![/quote]

I would like to echo this - it has been motivating for me as well. I am 56 and have been involved in training - martial arts (shotokan karate and bjj)since i was 6 - I wrestled in hs and college and competed internationally - I have lifted weights since hs and living a healthy lifestyle has been my obsession since leaving college.

It has been wonderful insurance for staying young and fit and chasing and sometimes even catching girls more than half my age!! (now watch I’ll get hit by a bus!!) but I am also a managing director or a large international architectural firm. This recent promotion has taken over my life as my obsession without me knowing it.

Lately, I have been missing my workouts more and more frequently (too tired I’d say). This has never happened to me before.

But having read about all the other old timers I once again feel motivated and “too tired be damned”!!! Thanks guys…

I would like to pass on my one important thing that has proven the most successful thing for me (if I may)and it is this: develop healthy habits regarding eating. Even when there were times I couldn’t workout I rarely gained a gram of fat - mostly because I have developed the habit of watching what I eat. It really is so simple but why can’t most people get it?

Anyway, lets keep this going as I am sure there are many over 35ers with lots of wonderful stories and recipes for health, wealth and sex into our 80’s!!!

And I’ll show you my pics if you’ll show me yours!!

I’ll be 39 in September and got serious about getting into shape due to an unexpected surprise - more kids! I have a 19 yr old, an 18 yr old, and then the surprise, a 2 yr old and a 10 month old (my only daughter).

I decided that if I wanted to be able to be active with the younger ones, I better get off my can and do something about the fact I was an overweight, out of shape pig. Since last July I have lost 60 lbs., from 250 down to 190, and I feel better than ever! This site has been extremely helpful as far as training and diet info. My initial goal is to ge to 200 lbs with 10% bf. Two weeks left on the Velocity Diet, then I am primed for a real mass building effort. I am thinking CT’s Hybrid Hypertrophy, which is what my workout on the V-Diet is based on.

Looking at the numbers you guys are lifting motivates me even more - I feel like a candy ass!

Dean

You are all truly inspiring. I was starting to get a bit discouraged because my gains had slowed at age 30. I feel more than a little silly now.

I have seen the light! :wink:

Time to stop looking for excuses and start looking for ways to improve.

Great post Assbuster!!
I am 48 and just really got back to training a few months ago.

Since May 2004, I have added 25 pounds of LBM to my frame. Over half of that has been totally natural gains. And all of it has been after my 39th birthday.

I’m not buying that “it’s time to maintain” B.S. either.

[quote]throttle132 wrote:
Since I’m 44 this excerpt below from Draper’s daily column interests me. I have gained some muscle in my 40’s and am wondering how much longer it can continue. However, my strength gains are more remarkable (a relative term) than my muscle gains. Looking for comments from the the over 40 crowd on this subject.

"Q. As a man over 40, have I lost the ability to “grow”? I continue to
train, but the “packing it on” stage seems to have left me. I lift about
the same weight. In fact, a bit more, but the growth (size) doesn’t seem
to come.

A. Two truths should be revisited and underscored at this point: that’s
life and everyone is different. A third truth can be added: 40 to 50 are
still very good growth years.

“That’s life” tells us we do slow down in our muscular growth as we age.
Yet, if the basic training precepts are followed – workout consistency,
hard training, smart eating and plenty of rest and relaxation – muscular
size, shape and quality can be improved perceptibly into our 60s. “That
everyone is different” – genetics, health, training acumen, drive,
toughness and such – tells us some will flourish more than others. Some
will flounder.

Sufficient exercise will keep one in shape. Swell. Those who are suited to
progress as they age need to be aggressive with their training, while at
once retaining commonsense, care and attentiveness to overtraining and
system abuse.

Finesse, passion and creativity are three major qualities that determine
and assure a trainee’s continued distinct advancement. They separate the
ordinary from the special.

Certain muscles that have not been overtrained or training-saturated –
rear delts, forearms, lower lats, thighs – can surprise us and respond
especially well to specific exercises, and restore our confidence and
delight in training and growing.

Finally, the over-40 lifter must be careful not to be dominated or
intimidated by the over 40 rhetoric. It is specious, spurious and insidious
with tentacles reaching the subconscious that defeat him before he’s 41."
[/quote]I train hard and my gains are very good. I’m 41 right now and a smoke jumper in the forest service. If I think about getting old I’ll probly accomplish it, but tell then “I don’t waist my time with it when it comes I won’t even notice because I’ll be to busy looking good”.

I’ll second what many have said. I am 42 and have never been stronger.

I am routinely mistaken for someone in their early 30’s. The perception being that a guy in his 40’s will not be in good condition.

I have gained a lot of muscle and stregth since turning 40 so it is possible.

My only regret…it sure was a lot easier with MAG-10 around. Loved that stuff. Miss it.

On this subject, one name comes to mind… Albert Beckles.

This thread is so great it inspired me to become a member here. I turn 40 in a couple of days, (June 28th)…and have been an iron afficionado off and on my whole adult life. I recently started in again after quite a long (4 year) layoff of beer drinking and debauchery. I looked in the mirror a few months ago and was repulsed at the fat old guy I saw looking back. I have alway been complimented on my youthful appearance and musculature. I’m 5’7 and currently at 180, but back in March it was 200 and I was ashen and sick looking…someone had shown me a photo they had taken of me last Thanksgiving, and I couldnt believe how much it looked like someone else, anyone else but ME! It became frightening.

I immediately moved the truck out of the garage and went shopping to convert it into the home gym it now is. I am fortunate I guess, that I have been a very avid bodybuilder in the past, and therefore knew right away what changes I needed to make in diet, lifestyle, and workout regime…

Yes…we still can make very good gains after 40…I’m a firm believer in supplements though, there are certain things we no longer produce at the same levels at our ages that can be maintained through supplementation. And it certainly is better for us than the daily alcohol (or whatever) consumption that we could be putting in our bodies instead…but nothing can replace the benefit of consistent and hard work.

I’m living proof…in roughly 4 months time, I look much more like my old self…it’s very encouraging when I hear my friends tell me how much better I am looking. (Which in turn has me feeling better mentally/emotionally and therefore my overall attitude and state of mind are much more positive and pleasant to be around…)

I hope I never “self-destruct” again.
And after seeing some footage of a 63 year old Albert Beckles doing a workout I couldnt have kept up with when I was 25, I am that much more encouraged!

Rock on my fellow elder brethren!!

Welcome to the site and welcome back to the iron game.

I’ve been where you’re coming from. Congrats on making the decision of getting back to training again.

If I can be of any assistance feel free to drop me a line.

You are right, Al Beckels is amazing. So is Bill Pearl. Check out this pick of him at age 74 http://www.fitwisewell.com/fit40/

Now that’s inspiration!

Your Brother in Iron,

Ass Buster