T Nation

3's PRO


#1

Greetings. I recently began my first seven week cycle (six weeks work and one deload week) of Beyond 5/3/1. This was after a little over a year on a linear progression program (the Greyskull Linear Progression). I switched into Beyond 5/3/1 because I moved from a unit that was mostly senior personnel who could do PT on their own to a unit that mandates all personnel to do PT as a unit (I’m currently active duty military). The training maxes and PR sets ensure that I can still get some good work in at the gym and the Joker Sets and First Set Last REALLY mean I can take advantage of days I feel 100% bulletproof.

As I’ve done some reading on the latest evolution of the Wendler 5/3/1 program I came across the 5’s PRO and references to the 3’s PRO version (though it wasn’t in the book). I presume 3’s PRO works along the same lines as 5’s PRO except reps are done for sets of 3 versus sets of 5, but I just wanted to make sure I wasn’t making an assumption.

BLUF: In any case I intend to stay on the Beyond 5/3/1 version I’m on (as outlined in the book) for a long while, but I’m curious as to what the 3’s PRO programming is.


#2

I’m using it for power/hang cleans. I use it just like 5’s PRO.


#3

IN GENERAL, 3’s PRO is ONLY used by very experienced lifters for power clean/snatch and deadlifts. Or if there is some kind of injury, but this is very rare. I do NOT ever recommend this for beginner or intermediate lifters.


#4

You use 5’s PRO with cleans? Sounds kind of high rep range for the movement.

I’m mostly training in same gym with competitive weightlifters so my view can be little different. 90% of the time people there (not only oly-lifters) are using 1-3 rep range for multiple sets.

But I’m not a expert about the subject. Maybe I’ll give 5’s PRO a chance with cleans after I reset.


#5

[quote]Rattus wrote:
You use 5’s PRO with cleans? Sounds kind of high rep range for the movement.

I’m mostly training in same gym with competitive weightlifters so my view can be little different. 90% of the time people there (not only oly-lifters) are using 1-3 rep range for multiple sets.

But I’m not a expert about the subject. Maybe I’ll give 5’s PRO a chance with cleans after I reset. [/quote]

One time when I was coaching football at the university, some kids came up to me and mentioned that Marshall Faulk (or whoever) only went up to 225 on the squat. This was their reasoning to never squat heavy.

I then asked them if they were Marshall Faulk. The answer was no.

In lifting, too many people think they are Olympic lifters and strut around with their shoes, tupperware of chalk and love to drop the bar from overhead, despite having less than 220 on the bar. If you are a high level Olympic lifter, sure 5 reps is a lot of reps.

For the rest of the pretenders, let it go and be honest with yourself. If you can’t do 5 reps on a clean, get over yourself. I like you Rattus and I hope you don’t take this as an insult. This was more for the idiots who love the labels but won’t ever do the real work.

It’s like when people think doing 10 reps on the squat is too high rep. Meanwhile, they hit a sloppy 215x4 and are determined to give their opinion.


#6

[quote]Jim Wendler wrote:
IN GENERAL, 3’s PRO is ONLY used by very experienced lifters for power clean/snatch and deadlifts. Or if there is some kind of injury, but this is very rare. I do NOT ever recommend this for beginner or intermediate lifters. [/quote]

Would you recommend the 3’s variation of Spinal Tap from the Beyond book in this instance?


#7

[quote]Jim Wendler wrote:

[quote]Rattus wrote:
You use 5’s PRO with cleans? Sounds kind of high rep range for the movement.

I’m mostly training in same gym with competitive weightlifters so my view can be little different. 90% of the time people there (not only oly-lifters) are using 1-3 rep range for multiple sets.

But I’m not a expert about the subject. Maybe I’ll give 5’s PRO a chance with cleans after I reset. [/quote]

One time when I was coaching football at the university, some kids came up to me and mentioned that Marshall Faulk (or whoever) only went up to 225 on the squat. This was their reasoning to never squat heavy.

I then asked them if they were Marshall Faulk. The answer was no.

In lifting, too many people think they are Olympic lifters and strut around with their shoes, tupperware of chalk and love to drop the bar from overhead, despite having less than 220 on the bar. If you are a high level Olympic lifter, sure 5 reps is a lot of reps.

For the rest of the pretenders, let it go and be honest with yourself. If you can’t do 5 reps on a clean, get over yourself. I like you Rattus and I hope you don’t take this as an insult. This was more for the idiots who love the labels but won’t ever do the real work.

It’s like when people think doing 10 reps on the squat is too high rep. Meanwhile, they hit a sloppy 215x4 and are determined to give their opinion.
[/quote]

I won’t. Thank you for the great answer. I’ll try higher rep ranges in the movement and suck it up.


#8

[quote]jblues85 wrote:

[quote]Jim Wendler wrote:
IN GENERAL, 3’s PRO is ONLY used by very experienced lifters for power clean/snatch and deadlifts. Or if there is some kind of injury, but this is very rare. I do NOT ever recommend this for beginner or intermediate lifters. [/quote]

Would you recommend the 3’s variation of Spinal Tap from the Beyond book in this instance?[/quote]

For the few that this is applicable for, yes. But it’s like saying, “Not everyone needs movement and mobility work.” Sure, not everyone but 99.999999999% of people do. It’s hard to make blanket statements as 100% of the time, people use the exception to win an argument on the internet. The truth is the same basic “rules” will apply to just about everyone.

You put your hand on a hot stove, it will burn. Just like everyone else.


#9

Thanks for the clarification, I appreciate it.