T Nation

20 Repetition Squat Weight

What’s a decent 20 rep squat weight compared to body weight?

I have slightly lower than body weight squat 135lbs for 20 reps(I weight between 140-145 on any give day).
My squats are always ATG or below parallel.

There is no answer to this question.

Okay, what can you squat for 20 repetitions?

1.5xbw?

[quote]a2_z wrote:
Okay, what can you squat for 20 repetitions?[/quote]

I hit 315 in my last workout after getting 405 for a set of 12 and a set of 6 at a bodyweight of 198. Been a long time since I went for a max weight set of 20.

Your 10RM. I’m unsure, but I don’t think you’re supposed to be doing 20 rep squats ATG. Also, at 140, you’re missing the milk component of the program.

BTW, there’s a copy of Super Squats on archives.org… but I think it’s scanned OCR and translated from another language or something because it’s an impossible read.

[quote]a2_z wrote:
What’s a decent 20 rep squat weight compared to body weight?

I have slightly lower than body weight squat 135lbs for 20 reps(I weight between 140-145 on any give day).
My squats are always ATG or below parallel.[/quote]

If you’re conditioning is good 60% of your max should be accessible. Its not about having a “decent 20 rep squat”, its about having a high max and good conditioning/strength endurance; having excellent form will minimize inefficencies in every rep as well

Edit: i should clarify this pertains to any compound lift, CT designed a program around it for several compound lifts

The best way to answer your question is this: “More weight than you did the last time”.

If you want standards like those people throw about for 1RMs you’re going to struggle, because not very many people care what they can squat for 20 reps.
Those who do care do it in a variety of different ways (non stop reps, no lockout, big breaths between reps, sucking it up and pushing through pain, or racking the bar when you start seeing stars) and that makes a difference to how much weight you’ll move.
I suspect you either want a goal to shoot towards, or want someone to tell you you’re doing a good job at the moment.
If it’s the former, go for double BW for 20 reps. That’s a high standard which most people won’t reach, but I suggest it to you because of this. If you shoot for that standard there are literally two options your training can take - you get there and are undeniably strong, or you get part of the way there, are pretty strong and more educated, and figure out what you actually want from your training and specialize your goals towards that.

Put down the books and do work plz.

[quote]Facepalm_Death wrote:

If you’re conditioning is good 60% of your max should be accessible.
[/quote]

Last time I hit a 20RM I got 120kg fairly easily while my max was around 180kg. My conditioning is not good. I don’t say this to be a dick, it just doesn’t fit in with what you’ve suggested.

[quote]MaazerSmiit wrote:

[quote]Facepalm_Death wrote:

If you’re conditioning is good 60% of your max should be accessible.
[/quote]

Last time I hit a 20RM I got 120kg fairly easily while my max was around 180kg. My conditioning is not good. I don’t say this to be a dick, it just doesn’t fit in with what you’ve suggested.[/quote]

That’s fair, here’s where i was coming from.

CT designed the 20 min muscle full body routine and i ran a modified version for a few months. It involved a 20 rep set at 60% of 1RMfor each lift. so:
1.For ANY compound lift (barbell row, bench press, military press, deadlift) 20 reps at 60% is doable
2. I did the 20rep set everyday and if i was fatigued on a particular day, conditioning was the limiting factor

To put it another way, 60% should be totally possible and is a good starting point, and if one can’t get 20 reps at 60% then their conditioning is probably very bad. I assume in this discussion that the tested 1RM is accurate and with good form

[quote]Facepalm_Death wrote:

[quote]MaazerSmiit wrote:

[quote]Facepalm_Death wrote:

If you’re conditioning is good 60% of your max should be accessible.
[/quote]

Last time I hit a 20RM I got 120kg fairly easily while my max was around 180kg. My conditioning is not good. I don’t say this to be a dick, it just doesn’t fit in with what you’ve suggested.[/quote]

That’s fair, here’s where i was coming from.

CT designed the 20 min muscle full body routine and i ran a modified version for a few months. It involved a 20 rep set at 60% of 1RM for each lift. so:
1.For ANY compound lift (barbell row, bench press, military press, deadlift) 20 reps at 60% is doable
2. I did the 20rep set everyday and if i was fatigued on a particular day, conditioning was the limiting factor
3. Form matters, sloppy reps are more taxing than clean reps because of all the energy leaks from wasted movement

To put it another way, 60% should be totally possible and is a good starting point, and if one can’t get 20 reps at 60% then their conditioning is probably very bad. I assume in this discussion that the tested 1RM is accurate and with good form.
[/quote]

Edited

I can’t even count to 20…

The first response is correct: no real answer.

It depends for one thing on how you count the reps – whether you’re going “up down up down” with virtually no rest in between reps or doing old-school “breathing squats”.

As someone said, there is a program in which take your 10RM and “find a way” to get to 20. This will be difficult, but perhaps worth it.

A couple weeks ago I did 275 x 17 just for fun. I could have done a few “breathers” and made it to 20. I weigh 179.

[quote]tsantos wrote:
I can’t even count to 20…[/quote]

Yeah same here especially when squatting.

[quote]bdocksaints75 wrote:

[quote]tsantos wrote:
I can’t even count to 20…[/quote]

Yeah same here especially when squatting.
[/quote]

I count backwards from 5 for 4 clusters. It’s something I saw in a Dan John article. Works real well for some reason.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]bdocksaints75 wrote:

[quote]tsantos wrote:
I can’t even count to 20…[/quote]
Yeah same here especially when squatting.
[/quote]
I count backwards from 5 for 4 clusters. It’s something I saw in a Dan John article. Works real well for some reason.[/quote]
Yeah, for some reason counting down seems to work well. I guess because you know there’s no more reps after the last one.

I usually counted up to 10, then down from 10. Usually somewhere between reps 12-14 I lost the ability to think straight, so starting the count down before that happened helped.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]bdocksaints75 wrote:

[quote]tsantos wrote:
I can’t even count to 20…[/quote]

Yeah same here especially when squatting.
[/quote]

I count backwards from 5 for 4 clusters. It’s something I saw in a Dan John article. Works real well for some reason.[/quote]

I’m a big fan of cluster counting for higher rep sets. For 20+ reps, I’ll usually count up for the first 10 or 15, then down in 5’s for additional reps.

As to the original question, I’m quite sure most people can’t squat their bodyweight for 20 reps. And I think Dan John’s mentioned that number as a minimum benchmark for athletes. So to me, that’s a number that, if you want to obtain and you’re even reasonably coordinated/athletic, you should be able to, but it would be rare for an untrained individual to be capable of this.

For myself, I have no idea what weight would be my ‘max’ for this task, but I’ve done 345 for 5 sets of 10, with my 1-rep max in the mid 400’s. I would feel comfortable hitting 20 reps at 315 any given day. I’m not suggesting this would be easy, but I’m confident that’s a number I could hit. My morning bodyweight is right about 190.

I know I got to 210 x 20 at 158 before I stopped doing 20 rep squats. I also did 155 x 30 at 155.

I put on ~20 lbs of bodyweight in a couple months with comparable leanness using 20 rep squats and milk. It was effective for what it claimed. I wouldn’t say it made me particularly bigger or stronger though, it just took me from very skinny to somewhat normal.

The first time I did them, I did the reps nonstop until I couldn’t, then rest pause. The second time, I did them “breathing style”, with at least 2 deep breaths between every rep. Breathing style was actually the harder of the two.

[quote]LoRez wrote:
I know I got to 210 x 20 at 158 before I stopped doing 20 rep squats. I also did 155 x 30 at 155.

I put on ~20 lbs of bodyweight in a couple months with comparable leanness using 20 rep squats and milk. It was effective for what it claimed. I wouldn’t say it made me particularly bigger or stronger though, it just took me from very skinny to somewhat normal.

The first time I did them, I did the reps nonstop until I couldn’t, then rest pause. The second time, I did them “breathing style”, with at least 2 deep breaths between every rep. Breathing style was actually the harder of the two.[/quote]

This about sums up my experience. I think everyone should run 6 weeks of the actual 20 Rep Squat program, with breathing squats. Probably one of the greatest ways available to develop mental toughness. It also helps put on size. That said, I gained minimal, if any, strength on the squat from it.

Really helps if you have a training partner that can remove the J-hooks after you unrack the weight.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Really helps if you have a training partner that can remove the J-hooks after you unrack the weight.[/quote]

That is just evil.