T Nation

20 Grams of Protein Per Sitting

i’m sure most of you have read the protein article recently written here. what are your thoughts on the 20 grams per protein absorption part?

That only accounts for “egg proteins.” I use to be eating 4 eggs every morning, (scrambled, over-easy, hard-boiled etc etc) but now I’m only eating 3. What I don’t get is how bodybuilders specifically would pound back dozens of eggs for their protein intake.

they say the best intake of protein is 20 grams 8 to 10 times a day depending on what your goals are.

thus bringing you to 160+ grams of protein each day…

then again you can eat more than 20 grams of protein in each sitting, some people eat 50 per sitting.

When I first got into bodybuilding nearly 20 years ago it was reported even then that the body could only process in the region of 20-25g PRO at any one time.

You may also want to check out a study HIT author Ellington Darden was involved in many years ago - which involved collecting your urine over a period of time, which was then analysed. Darden was on a typical bodybuilder high protein diet. The upshot was Darden excreted excess protein meaning the daily recommended 0.3g per lb was adequate even for bodybuilders.

[quote]kickureface wrote:
i’m sure most of you have read the protein article recently written here. what are your thoughts on the 20 grams per protein absorption part?[/quote]

my understanding was that there wont be an additional anabolic response past 20g of protein, but its still absorbed.

[quote]Fulford wrote:
That only accounts for “egg proteins.” I use to be eating 4 eggs every morning, (scrambled, over-easy, hard-boiled etc etc) but now I’m only eating 3. What I don’t get is how bodybuilders specifically would pound back dozens of eggs for their protein intake.[/quote]

Now I don’t know if it is a good idea for you to cut back on eggs just because an article claims only a specific amount of protein is beneficial but there is something to be said about a bodybuilder’s protein intake.

A bodybuilder using AAS will have the ability to synthesize much more protein than someone training naturally. 220-250 pound pros will eat upwards of 600g of protein per day.

But I also know for a fact that there are plenty of big guys who don’t use AAS that eat 8+ eggs a day and do just fine.

[quote]Fulford wrote:
That only accounts for “egg proteins.” I use to be eating 4 eggs every morning, (scrambled, over-easy, hard-boiled etc etc) but now I’m only eating 3. What I don’t get is how bodybuilders specifically would pound back dozens of eggs for their protein intake.[/quote]

I’m far from a bodybuilder. I’m SMALL(5’10" 170ish lbs). I have no problem downing 10 large hard boiled eggs every morning, after eating 20oz of whole milk and 2 scoops of protein shake. Been eating 10 a day for a few months and noticed a good increase in strength and overall energy.

You still need the calories for building mass. Calories are either going to come from fat, protein, or carbs. Regardless of anabolic response, absorption, etc. You still need the calories and people trying to minimize fat gains are going to focus on ingesting protein as the prefered source for the kcals.

[quote]Fulford wrote:
That only accounts for “egg proteins.” I use to be eating 4 eggs every morning, (scrambled, over-easy, hard-boiled etc etc) but now I’m only eating 3. What I don’t get is how bodybuilders specifically would pound back dozens of eggs for their protein intake.[/quote]

There are protein shakes that use egg protein.

I read that article. I’m not educated enough in this area to say foresure but I would think the weight & size of the person plus the type of protein consumed would have an important effect on the exact usable amount someone can digest? If anyone has anymore recent facts, I’d be interested as well.

As long as it does not hurt to eat more it shouldn’t matter even if the body only uses 20g. Just to get enough calories a day I need about 40g per meal. With less protein I would be eating a shitload of carbs, if anything my protein intake is just to balance out the carbs/fat.

I think it is important to note the study was looking at increases of protein synthesis. Past 20 grams there were no more increases in PS, but this does not mean it is “bad” to have more than 20 grams at a time. Like Dr. Lowery said more at one time for volume purposes and the Calories.

That extra protein will also help with G-flux

As everyone else has already said… you’ve got to eat something. More protein won’t hurt.

But the 20g of protein per meal does seem like an interesting “floor” on consumption. If my meal doesn’t have 20g of protein… I’m not sure if I’m even going to think of it as a real meal.

This debate has been going on for as long as I can remember and I am sure many here will agree with me also. We have all read the 1.5 to 2 grams per pound of bodyweight per day. Get some in you pre workout and ramp it up post work out. Then you have to factor in, casual lifter or competative. Oh, lets not forget the different types of protein and when to take those. I can be mind numbing.

My thoughts, listen to your body. If the weights and reps go up with increased protein intake, by all means do it. If you fart too much around your woman, cut back.

[quote]Fulford wrote:
That only accounts for “egg proteins.” [/quote]

Right on point, although I think researchers are definitely onto something about absorption capability. I don’t know if I misread but weren’t the egg proteins added to shakes for the purpose of the study if so, it stands to reason eggs weren’t cook.

As TC pointed out in a recent article and as I remember from my nutrition course, raw food is harder to digest and harder to absorb correctly. If that was the case in the study Dr Lowery referred to, then i’m sure we’d see a bit of a difference when using hard boiled eggs or cooked eggs in any other matter.

Besides Protein type must matter to, as does gender and size in one individual’s requirement, and probably so in one individual’s absorption capacity.

[quote]GusBus07 wrote:
I think it is important to note the study was looking at increases of protein synthesis. Past 20 grams there were no more increases in PS, but this does not mean it is “bad” to have more than 20 grams at a time. Like Dr. Lowery said more at one time for volume purposes and the Calories.[/quote]

Good post.

X2 on G-Flux increase.

[quote]JamesBrawn007 wrote:
When I first got into bodybuilding nearly 20 years ago it was reported even then that the body could only process in the region of 20-25g PRO at any one time.

You may also want to check out a study HIT author Ellington Darden was involved in many years ago - which involved collecting your urine over a period of time, which was then analysed. Darden was on a typical bodybuilder high protein diet. The upshot was Darden excreted excess protein meaning the daily recommended 0.3g per lb was adequate even for bodybuilders.[/quote]

That was Darden’s upshot, rather than being a logically-following conclusion.

Ditto for the 20 g protein conclusion in the recent article.

(Also, it was not that excess or indeed any protein was found in Darden’s urine, but that nitrogen excretion in urine approximately equaled nitrogen intake from protein. Darden went into the thing with a mistaken belief that much less nitrogen would be excreted than taken in, and accepted of his professor’s premise that if they were about equal then that supposedly would prove the protein was wasted.)

Well, the obvious problem would be then, why is there so much empirical evidence that more protein is better?

Sure that my say that you only need ~170g per day but I’d bet if I kept my kcal the same and dropped my protein down to that point I’d lose muscular weight and strength.

Shit, most of the time when I’m slowing down on muscle growth it’s for lack of protein, I get great growth when I’m knocking on 1.5g/lb+ per day.

I want more data, a lot more before I decide, but my first instinct is to call shenanigans.

Not shenanigans, but drawing conclusions that in fact do not follow.