T Nation

2 Specific Jab Questions

question number 1 - As a southpaw I was looking for any extra details for landing a stiff jab? The angle is obviously different and was looking for any tips or tricks I can do for landing a jab on the opposite stance

and 2 - It has a ton of names, stick jab,blinding jab,etc
Its a jab and a second pause to blind them, then bam comes your second punch.
Instead of a beat say ex: 1-2 its a beat of 1–2
a great example would be here

My real question is what are the pros/cons of this and what to look for, how to make this as effective as possible?
Also if anyone else has any sort of video of a fighter utlizing this that would be great.

Thanks in advance!!!

not sure if linked worked for some people but youtube this - Boxing - Randall Bailey Vs Francisco Figueroa (Incredible KO) thats the example for the second jab

[quote]shs101 wrote:
question number 1 - As a southpaw I was looking for any extra details for landing a stiff jab? The angle is obviously different and was looking for any tips or tricks I can do for landing a jab on the opposite stance

and 2 - It has a ton of names, stick jab,blinding jab,etc
Its a jab and a second pause to blind them, then bam comes your second punch.
Instead of a beat say ex: 1-2 its a beat of 1–2
a great example would be here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tCFh...ayer_embedded#!

My real question is what are the pros/cons of this and what to look for, how to make this as effective as possible?
Also if anyone else has any sort of video of a fighter utlizing this that would be great.

Thanks in advance!!![/quote]

  1. I’m not sure there are any tips that are different for a southpaw. The reality is that you’re not at an advantage for being a southpaw. A lot of southpaws think they should be automatically a dangerous fighter, or landing a higher percentage of shots. It’s not true. A good fighter is a good fighter, regardless of what side you lead from. You say the angle is different, but it isn’t really. You still have to get past a blokes guard. To do that, like any orthodox fighter, you have to create angles for yourself, vary your jabs, step in behind them, flick them, double, triple, quadruple upon them, establish patterns in your opponents head, so body head, body head, then feint to the body lead jab to the head, keep your lead foot outside their lead foot, tap their jab down with your lead hand and shoot your jab/lead right over the top (a nice move Mayweather does effectively and often), etc, etc, etc. All that is only a tiny fraction of what you can and should do with your jab to make it effective. Just being a southpaw doesn’t make you a good fighter.

  2. The video hasn’t shown up, so I can’t be sure what you’re talking about, but it looks like you’re asking about varying your rhythm. In which case, that’s exactly the kind of thing you should be doing, and what helps you move up to a higher level of ability. Again, it can be done a thousand different ways. You can create patterns in your opponent’s head, and when he goes to anticipate your ‘2’, you pause, then strike, catching him off rhythm himself. One of the key’s to going from being a decent fighter to a really good fighter is being aware of your own rhythm and being able to disrupt it, so that your opponent isn’t timing you, or catching/slipping your shots easily and cleanly. Another very effective way of landing this shot is to step off as/straight after you jab, automatically creating a pause and an angle at the same time. So for you, I might flick the right jab, and step outside at the same time, then as soon as the weight transfer was complete, I’d throw the straight left and look to catch my opponent as he moved to compensate for me moving. Another way is to feint with the shoulder of your lead hand after you throw your jab, as if you are going to throw a double jab. Or feint with the elbow of your lead hand, as if you’re going to hook off the jab, then just let your right hand go.

One of the important things in my mind with this technique is to relax into it. A lot of fighters I see trying to do it panic cos they’ve paused, and so tense up and try to throw it hard. Just relax, it’s the shots they don’t see coming that will do the most damage. Just enjoy the split second pause, and snap out the ‘2’

Bernard Hopkins is very good at this technique, and worth studying anyway.

I personally believe the stiff Jabb is the effect of everything in your body, your whole cns firing appropriately and being ‘tense’ right at the last moment upon impact. You can’t have perfect technique in your arms and shoulders are out, hips are wrong or weight transfer wrong. So as LB said, relax until the end. An unseen Jab feels like a stiff Jab because people just don’t know it’s coming. Learning how to throw it deceptively without any telegraphing is key.

I remember once lobbing punches and kicks at this Islander, bloody hell, nothing effected him then I popped a stiff Jab, not much power in it but it was thrown from the hip and he didn’t see it. It dead stopped him in his tracks as he was coming in on me, he stumbled back and just saved himself from falling… enough to keep me on the assault for the rest of the round.

Just do it over and over, every angle, fast, slow, touch your opponent up. Do it starting, do it finishing, do it as a power punch, do it as a tap just keep doing it. Get your breath right so your diaphragm fills and expands at the right moment. A loose core will render all your punches ineffective and I’m not only talking about strength in your core muscles but strength in your breathing.

Thanks for the responses ill take them into training.
Also does anyone have any advice for landing the lead hook vs an opposite stance? I’m trying to find out the best positioning for me to land the lead hook also feeding off his leed arm position how I can land the hook the most effectively. Whether his lead arm is high and tight or out/feeler type…I feel since the oppposite stance,the lead shoulder is an obstacle to get around.

[quote]humble wrote:
I personally believe the stiff Jabb is the effect of everything in your body, your whole cns firing appropriately and being ‘tense’ right at the last moment upon impact. You can’t have perfect technique in your arms and shoulders are out, hips are wrong or weight transfer wrong. So as LB said, relax until the end. An unseen Jab feels like a stiff Jab because people just don’t know it’s coming. Learning how to throw it deceptively without any telegraphing is key.

I remember once lobbing punches and kicks at this Islander, bloody hell, nothing effected him then I popped a stiff Jab, not much power in it but it was thrown from the hip and he didn’t see it. It dead stopped him in his tracks as he was coming in on me, he stumbled back and just saved himself from falling… enough to keep me on the assault for the rest of the round.

Just do it over and over, every angle, fast, slow, touch your opponent up. Do it starting, do it finishing, do it as a power punch, do it as a tap just keep doing it. Get your breath right so your diaphragm fills and expands at the right moment. A loose core will render all your punches ineffective and I’m not only talking about strength in your core muscles but strength in your breathing.

[/quote]

Yep. A stiff jab is just a jab with your weight behind it - kind of “vaulting” off that back foot and into the punch. You don’t really land it any differently than a regular jab. For some guys, it IS their regular jab.

[quote]shs101 wrote:
Thanks for the responses ill take them into training.
Also does anyone have any advice for landing the lead hook vs an opposite stance? I’m trying to find out the best positioning for me to land the lead hook also feeding off his leed arm position how I can land the hook the most effectively. Whether his lead arm is high and tight or out/feeler type…I feel since the oppposite stance,the lead shoulder is an obstacle to get around.[/quote]

If you’re talking about landing the lead hook against a righty when you’re a lefty… you’ve got to be either

  1. Really fast
  2. Taking advantage of a lead hand that’s held too low
  3. Catching him coming in - ala Mayweather vs. Ricky Hatton with that little check hook

Otherwise, hooks aren’t great to lead with. They’re good to counter with (you bob under his hook and counter with your own) or to follow up with (you throw your 1-2-3, or your 1-2-3body and then come upstairs for a hook to the head).

Otherwise you’ve got to hide them. They’re not supposed to be looping punches like many guys throw - they’re supposed to be tight and inside, like the punch that BHop knocked out Tito with. Therefore, you gotta throw some punches at the front door, get the dude to bring his arms up and together, and then you take a step to your right (if you’re a southpaw) and turn that hook in behind his guard.

Don’t force punches to work in spots they’re not good in. Just like you’re not going to try and knock someone out with a jab, you’re generally not going to lead with a hook unless you’re fighting in the phone booth or your very fucking fast.

My two cents.