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2 Questions About My Anabolic Diet

Hey guys. I’m getting on the Anabolic Diet in about 2 weeks, so I’d like to set up an outline of my diet this weekend to have everything prepared and ready to go when the time comes to go on it. My questions are the following…

  1. How does PWO nutrition play into this diet? Do you still use a High GI carb source to spike your insulin or no? According to the guidelines, I should not consume more than 30 G of carbs a day. However, my regular PWO nutrition includes 60 G of carbs. What should I do?

My guess is that the benefits of a PWO insulin spike outweigh any silly dietary guideline, so on weight training days, I was planning to just have no carbs the whole day and go ahead and continue to have my 60 G after my workout. What do you guys think?

  1. While formulating my diet, should I follow the principles of temporal nutrition by structuring it so I get the bulk of my calories in my breakfast, and then reduce my caloric intake per meal as the day progresses? Example :

If I’m going to be taking in 2500 calories a day, which set up is better?

Setup A - 415,415,415,415,415,415

Setup B - 665,565,465,365,265,165

I ask this because I followed a setup similar to Setup B while I was on my cutting diet, and I was wondering if this setup was still the most favorable for using on a clean bulk (when I start it) to help minimize fat gain.

A brief explanation of what I’m trying to accomplish…On my current diet, I currently take in less than 2000 calories, so I don’t want to just slam my metabolism with 3000 calories out of nowhere.

When I get off this diet in 2 weeks, I plan to use the Anabolic Diet at first to find out what my maintenance caloric intake is and start by bumping up my daily caloric intake by 500 calories.

If I gain weight by the end of the week, I’ll lower it by 250. If I lose weight, I’ll add 250. I’d just like to take this summer to enjoy my hard earned low body fat, figure out my maintenance caloric intake, and have my body get accustomed to the Anabolic Diet.

Then, in about 2 months, I should have a good idea of what my maintenance caloric intake is, at which point I’ll bump it up another 500 calories or so and begin my clean bulk. What do you guys think? As always guys, your help is appreciated.

#1 NO, not during the break in phase for sure and not really the rest of the time lest you w/o on a high carb up day

#2 sure thats can always be solid

other then that id say check out the million post long thread in the supp and nut forum on the AD

any question you have is in that thing

Phill

The reason nobody is answering your questions is because they’ve already been answered

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=658379

If you don’t have the book I’d get it. I downloaded The Anabolic Diet. The Metabolic Diet is the same thing but with added info. Make sure you weight your meals count your carbs fat and pro. Get a nutrition guide book. I write everything down to make sure I get it right.

That thread really isn’t much help, as all the information is totally scattered everywhere and hidden amongst thousands of letters of text that have nothing to do with my questions.

Thanks for answering my second question Phil. However, you say I shouldn’t have PWO carbs while on the Anabolic Diet, but you didn’t offer me an alternative to PWO nutrition that is better suited for that diet.

Are you saying that while on The Anabolic Diet, you never have PWO carbs period? Or just not during the start up phase, in which case, what do you have PWO instead?

[quote]Velz wrote:
That thread really isn’t much help, as all the information is totally scattered everywhere and hidden amongst thousands of letters of text that have nothing to do with my questions.

Thanks for answering my second question Phil. However, you say I shouldn’t have PWO carbs while on the Anabolic Diet, but you didn’t offer me an alternative to PWO nutrition that is better suited for that diet.

Are you saying that while on The Anabolic Diet, you never have PWO carbs period? Or just not during the start up phase, in which case, what do you have PWO instead? [/quote]

You’re a lazy fucktard! I don’t think you can have a question about the AD that isn’t in that thread, you’re just too lazy to read it. I read it, and that’s how I know the answers to your questions (Yes YOUR questions. Your ascertation that your questioned aren’t addressed in that thread is absurd!).

If you bothered to read it, you’d not only understand the diet, but realize that your question (regarding PWO carbs) is pretty ignorant.

I realize I may not have 10,000 posts to my name, that’s because I spend my time READING and LEARNING.

[quote]whosyobobby wrote:
Velz wrote:
That thread really isn’t much help, as all the information is totally scattered everywhere and hidden amongst thousands of letters of text that have nothing to do with my questions.

Thanks for answering my second question Phil. However, you say I shouldn’t have PWO carbs while on the Anabolic Diet, but you didn’t offer me an alternative to PWO nutrition that is better suited for that diet.

Are you saying that while on The Anabolic Diet, you never have PWO carbs period? Or just not during the start up phase, in which case, what do you have PWO instead?

You’re a lazy fucktard! I don’t think you can have a question about the AD that isn’t in that thread, you’re just too lazy to read it. I read it, and that’s how I know the answers to your questions (Yes YOUR questions. Your ascertation that your questioned aren’t addressed in that thread is absurd!).

If you bothered to read it, you’d not only understand the diet, but realize that your question (regarding PWO carbs) is pretty ignorant.

I realize I may not have 10,000 posts to my name, that’s because I spend my time READING and LEARNING.
[/quote]

Never said the thread didn’t possibly have the answers to my question, however, I just wasn’t feeling up to sifting through so much text for them when I can just ask people directly and receive more personalized attention.

I also have spent the entire day reading through T-Nation articles, and was currently reading through “The Anabolic Diet” itself. I don’t see the crime in just posting my question while I continue reading it and laying out my diet.

Regardless, your post was childish, uncalled for, and totally useless. I’d appreciate it if you saved yourself the anguish of dealing with my “lazyness and ignorance” by not coming into this thread with your 2 insipid cents. Thanks.

[quote]Velz wrote:
That thread really isn’t much help, as all the information is totally scattered everywhere and hidden amongst thousands of letters of text that have nothing to do with my questions.

Thanks for answering my second question Phil. However, you say I shouldn’t have PWO carbs while on the Anabolic Diet, but you didn’t offer me an alternative to PWO nutrition that is better suited for that diet.

Are you saying that while on The Anabolic Diet, you never have PWO carbs period? Or just not during the start up phase, in which case, what do you have PWO instead? [/quote]

A steak bro, maybe some broccoli with it and olive oil

Im saying you dont unless like I said it was lifting on a carb up day.

Phill

Velz,

I’ll let Mauro answer you directly:

Question: What is the rationale behind no carbs post training? I can understand most of the science and reasoning behind the diet, but this one I just can’t figure out.

Answer:
The usual rationale to taking in carbs after training is twofold. One to increase insulin levels so that it leads to an increase in the transport and incorporation into muscle and other cells - the overall result is an increase in protein synthesis that occurs in concert with hyperaminoacidemia.

The second reason is to rapidly replenish muscle glycogen. These are commendable reasons to take in a load of dietary carbs after training. However this is mostly for the benefit of those who are carb adapted and is not as useful for those who are fat adapted, as in those who are on my macronutrient phase shift diets.

One of the reasons is that when you’re fat adapted insulin doesn’t do exactly the same things as when you’re carb adapted. For example insulin has less of an effect on lipogenesis and on decreasing lipolysis when you’re fat adapted than if you’re carb dependant.

Also the presence of fat combined with protein and carbs does not decrease the insulin response or the absorption of amino acids and protein as it does with those who are carb adapted. As such a post training meal has different effects on insulin response and levels when you’re fat adapted. The problem with taking in a lot of carbs post training is that while it increases insulin, something that amino acids and protein can do quite well, it also decreases GH and IGF-I expression.

On the other hand using protein and amino acids to increase insulin also increases GH and IGF-I levels and provides a much more anabolic effect overall while at the same time preserving lipid oxidation post exercise. Also the use of amino acids and fat, with a minimum of carbs post workout, in someone who is fat adapted, besides leading to an increase in insulin (without as much of an adverse effect on fat metabolism - at least for our purposes) and not affecting the absorption of protein and amino acids from the GI tract, it also dramatically increases intramuscular triacylglycerol levels, which is the fat that is first used up with exercise, before blood levels of FFA.

At the same time there is also some increase in glycogen levels, both hepatic and muscular, first of all through the small amounts of carbs that are part of the MRP LoCarb, and more importantly through the gluconeogenic process. promoting mobilization of fat and simultaneously maintaining lean body mass, specifically muscle mass TCA cycle anapleurosis - changes in PDH activation and as such the production of acetyl-coA preventing catabolism of endogenous protein during exercise while maintaining high endogenous utilization of lipid is to provide a dietary source of amino acids.

I depend on the weekend carb up to supply high levels of insulin and a glycogen supercompensation. Basically you can eat what you want but you can’t overdo it because at some point you are going to go past the supercompensation of glycogen (both muscular and hepatic) and intramuscular triaglycerols and start laying down fat and almost halting lipolysis. Fat adaptation will only take you so far and if you overdo it you will increase your body fat.

BTW you might be interested in my new Anabolic Solution for Bodybuilders. Low resting glycogen per se does not impair the increase in TCAI during moderate exercise. The whole world has been on the carb merrygoround so long that it?s hard to even pause the massive inertia its gained. Most people feel that carbs before training, during training and after training is the answer to all our exercise woes.

For over three decades I?ve been saying the exact opposite. Mainly that the use of carbs anywhere near exercise is counter productive. In the stead of carbs I?ve substituted amino acids and proteins because they can do what carbs do while at the same time maximizing body composition, increasing muscle mass and decreasing body fat.

A pointed example of this is my Exersol - the exercise solution. There?s nary a carb to be seen in these formulas. Resolve, the preexercise primer uses a number of ingredients to form a complex synergistically acting formula that individual amino acids.


Straight from the horse’s mouth. :wink:

Best,
DH

A few more quick reviews:

Question:
You recommend 30grams of carbs a day on weekdays,is it important to reach ketosis before carb up as recommended by dan duchaine in bodyopous ,or do you not recommend reaching that state?

Answer:
Reaching ketosis, at least as far as being able to measure it using a ketostix, believe it or not, doesn’t relate in the least to how well you do on the diet. Keep in mind that the depth of ketosis is NOT indicative of the degree of fat oxidation or lipolysis. I don’t even suggest you check your urine.

The important thing is to fine tune the diet until you get the results you want. Once you’ve adapted to the diet, you’ll use up most of the ketones you produce and as such shouldn’t show much ketones in the body during the weekdays.

Question:
I just started the diet and notice some low carb foods will say they have 0 sugar carb, however, they have several other carb types (i.e. alcohol carbs). I noticed on your website that you say fiber carbs do not count. Are there any other carbs that do not count?

Answer:
While your question seems simple to answer, it in fact can be quite complicated. In fact when you look at the issues in detail you discover that runs the gamut of explaining why a carb may not be a carb, that a non carb may be a carb and everything in between. I believe that anything that disrupts fatty acid breakdown and oxidation is detrimental to the diet, at least in the initial stages where you are trying to determine the lowest level of carbs that works best for your metabolism.

As such, some foods or ingredients, while not technically carbs, should be factored in as if they were carbs. This includes alcohol, glycerin or glycerol, lactate and pyruvate. Some foods or ingredients, while technically carbs, don’t act as regular carbs on the metabolism.

For example inulin and oligofructose, storage carbs that are found in some plants, have just under 1/3 the effect of regular carbs on metabolism and as such can be taken into account at that level - for example 3 grams of inulin would be equivalent to one gram of carbs. The reason for this is that inulin and oligofructose have a ?(2 1) bonds linking the fructose molecules. These bonds render them nondigestible by human intestinal enzymes.

Thus, inulin and oligofructose pass through the mouth, stomach and small intestine without being metabolized. As such, almost all of the inulin or oligofructose ingested enters the colon where it is totally fermented by the colonic microflora. The energy derived from fermentation is largely a result of the production of mostly short-chain fatty acids and some lactate, which are metabolized and contribute 1.5 kcal/g of useful energy for both oligofructose and inulin.

However, because most of these products are likely mostly absorbed into the portal vein and therefore enter the body proper, and because I consider lactate and short chain fatty acids as equivalent to carbs, this 1.5 calories per gram, out of a possible 4 calories per gram., has to be factored into your carb intake.

Insoluble fiber, even though technically a carb, is not absorbed and as such doesn’t impact on your systemic macronutrient mix. So insoluble fiber shouldn’t be counted in either the carb or calorie columns. Soluble fiber is another story and is somewhat of a gray area in the carb/calorie equation. Pectin, for example, undergoes vigorous fermentation in the cecum and produces high levels of short-chain fatty acids.

So while fiber, both soluble and insoluble are good for you and good for the diet, you can’t
overdo it. Regulate, a fiber formulation that works optimally for those on my Metabolic Diet, is a mixture of insoluble and soluble fibers, which at 10 caps a day provides a negligible carb equivalent of one gram. For the same effectiveness you’d have to take 5 carb grams worth of other fiber preparations, such as Metamucil.

For all the newbs. I felt generous today. :wink:

Best,
DH

Good to see you Hoss. Your posts convinced me to hop aboard the AD train. Thanks for all the great information.

Yeah, not to take anything away from anyone else, but I doubt you will find a better authority on the AD outside of DiPasquale himself than Disc Hoss

i have a question. ive heard that one should count diet soda(sucralose/splenda) as 1 carb gram per 12oz. any ideas??

and why is it recomm. that one shouldnt consume “aspartame” in diet drinks??

also does one find the method of sub. fiber from carb for the true # of carbs to be valid.

thanks.

[quote]ironmanlives79 wrote:
i have a question. ive heard that one should count diet soda(sucralose/splenda) as 1 carb gram per 12oz. any ideas??

and why is it recomm. that one shouldnt consume “aspartame” in diet drinks??

also does one find the method of sub. fiber from carb for the true # of carbs to be valid.

thanks. [/quote]

I’m guessing because splenda is cut with maltodextrin as a filler and thus each packet of splenda has a small amount of sugar.

[quote]ironmanlives79 wrote:
i have a question. ive heard that one should count diet soda(sucralose/splenda) as 1 carb gram per 12oz. any ideas??

and why is it recomm. that one shouldnt consume “aspartame” in diet drinks??

also does one find the method of sub. fiber from carb for the true # of carbs to be valid.

thanks. [/quote]

Oh, and I find subtracting fiber to be quite valid - though I may be smacked with replies from lo-carb finatics who disagree. If anything, fiber is more like an anti-carb given it’s effect on glucose/insulin.