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16 Year Old w/ Some Questions

I’ve been coming to this site for awhile now, but I just signed up recently. I’ve been reading all these weight gain plans, and everything else. I was wondering if anything should be done differently at this age. I’m 5’7 - 5’8 … and I weigh 145. I weighed 150 a month or so ago, but I stopped lifting for awhile, and my weight started to drop. So my question is, how’s the best way to start lifting after a month long break? And, is there anything differently I should do at this age?

[quote]silent_circus wrote:
I’ve been coming to this site for awhile now, but I just signed up recently. I’ve been reading all these weight gain plans, and everything else. I was wondering if anything should be done differently at this age. I’m 5’7 - 5’8 … and I weigh 145. I weighed 150 a month or so ago, but I stopped lifting for awhile, and my weight started to drop. So my question is, how’s the best way to start lifting after a month long break? And, is there anything differently I should do at this age?[/quote]

Well, you didn’t really mention your age:)

Other than taking it easy the first couple of times you’re training (I recommend whole body workouts * 3 for the first week) there’s really nothing else you should do differently (assuming you’re eating right of course).

If I may semi-hijack this thread, does that also mean that, for teens, doing heavy deadlifts and squats are ok (using proper form)

I would say yes. Not only are squats and dead OK nbut should be a must in training at any age.

The most improtant thing being dropping your ego, and using FLAWLESS form. Make perfect form an automatic befor going for heavier weight, progress slowly and you wont be sorry. You will fight off injury and still make awesome progress.

As for the original post. I suggest just starting slow. Read up on the Dawg school series and thing like Big boy basics. Pratice using big compound movements with flawless form, and moderate reps and loads. Then slowly progress.

Hope this Helps
Phill

[quote]lmjudek wrote:

Well, you didn’t really mention your age:)

[/quote]

The title of the thread is 16 year old w/ some questions.

Good advice, though, just bustin’ your balls.

After a month long break, I would start easy. Don’t go to failure(if you ever do), keep the weight kind of light, etc. There’s no reason in going all out and hurting yourself. Of course, if you have stayed fairly well-conditioned during the month, the precautions don’t need to be as drastic as if you were a lazy slob for a month. You can make that call.

I don’t see a problem with heavy deads, as long as form is kept in check. Of course, “teens” is a pretty loose term. If you’re 12, I would say no, but 16, go for it.

As for squats, some say not to put pressure on the spine when still growing. I’m not sure however, maybe some one else can chime in on that one. Or, try doing a search on squatting for youngins. It’s been discussed before.

Good Luck

oh yeah, if you’re a teen and you’ve already found this site, consider yourself lucky.

You ask if your training should be different from others. Considering that most people’s training is continually evolving - going from high volume, low frequency to high frequency, low volume, then taking into account intensity … etc etc, there are a million variations - I’d say “Different from what?” I’ll second everything Phill’s already said ESPECIALLY about the flawless form and including the compound movements. i’ll add in my own two cents, some of which may get me flamed. First, I think you can handle a slightly greater frequency than more experienced lifters. second theres a “rule” that your workouts shouldnt last more than an hour. Dont flaunt that rule, but if it takes you an hour and 15 minutes, and hour and a half to get your workout done, do it. Have a plan. By that I mean know what exercises youre going to do this week, which days your doing them on and what set.rep scheme you’re using for each of them. Dont finish an exercise and then stare dumbly around the gym waiting for an apparatus to do a tap dance to attract your attention. Finally, EAT. If you doing nothing else for your weightlifting goals - be they physique or performance related - the two most important rules are 1) Bust. Your. Ass. and 2) get at least 1g/lb of bodyweight broken up evenly into 6 meals over the day. if you’re looking for any programs for high school kids check my old posts. Theres a four day plan in “Help designing a high school lifting program” and a 3 day in “Joe Kenns Tier System”

Damnit smallnomore, you made me feel like an idiot! I was looking at the post over and over looking for age, but I forgot to look at the title…

Thanks everyone for the help. I’ll probably start lifting once I renew my membership to the rec. center.

Don’t forget food. Looking back on my training in high school, I only got bigger when I ate enough and well enough. Seems obvious, but then I realized that I only got stronger when I ate enough, too. So remember, your workouts in the gym mean very little unless they’re backed up by a sound diet.