T Nation

100 Pushups in One Set

how many here can do 100 pushups in 1 set?

[quote]spk wrote:
how many here can do 100 pushups in 1 set?[/quote]

Depends on how these pushups are being performed. If they are all the way down (chest touches the floor) and all the way up ( a full elbow lockout with a distinct pause) and performed with a rigid plank-like body structure, I have to say not many out there can. Would be one hell of a feat of endurance and body control!

…I wonder what you would have to give up to be able to that.

Does a pause at the top of the movement count towards the set or does it break it?

Either way I can’t do it. Nor do I really want to. But would be impressive to see.

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
…I wonder what you would have to give up to be able to that. [/quote]

I’m not sure I understand…?

[quote]shibboleth wrote:
Does a pause at the top of the movement count towards the set or does it break it?

Either way I can’t do it. Nor do I really want to. But would be impressive to see.[/quote]

What? This is not that complicated. We’re talking a pause of a second in which the elbows are fully extended(locked out) at the top of the movement. The cadence of each rep would be administered in a manner to avoid the bouncing and momentum so prevalent in fast, “jerky” push ups. In this style (“jerky”) there is no steady elbow lockout prior to the the eccentric phase and often times no chest contact with the floor. Very high reps are possible however.

[quote]In10s wrote:

[quote]shibboleth wrote:
Does a pause at the top of the movement count towards the set or does it break it?

Either way I can’t do it. Nor do I really want to. But would be impressive to see.[/quote]

What? This is not that complicated. We’re talking a pause of a second in which the elbows are fully extended(locked out) at the top of the movement. The cadence of each rep would be administered in a manner to avoid the bouncing and momentum so prevalent in fast, “jerky” push ups. In this style (“jerky”) there is no steady elbow lockout prior to the the eccentric phase and often times no chest contact with the floor. Very high reps are possible however.[/quote]

I’m not sure, but I think shibboleth may be asking about a loaded rest/pause at lockout. In 20 rep squats, for instance, one often uses a weight that they can only really get 10 reps one after the other. To get 20 the trainee pauses at the top of each rep, still loaded under the bar, but “resting” until he can continue. This is still thought of as 1 “set” because the bar is never put down.

Same could be said of pushups. Are we able to rest/pause at the top in the plank position working toward a max within a time limit (i.e. 2 minutes)? That’s how a lot of fitness tests work.

Either way, I can’t do it.

All symantics aside, one set of 100 is impressive. There was a finisher on a Defranco workout that was 100 pushups for time. The best I was ever able to get was around 65 on the first set. From there it was no more than 12-15 or less, much less towards the end.

[quote]batman730 wrote:

[quote]In10s wrote:

[quote]shibboleth wrote:
Does a pause at the top of the movement count towards the set or does it break it?

Either way I can’t do it. Nor do I really want to. But would be impressive to see.[/quote]

What? This is not that complicated. We’re talking a pause of a second in which the elbows are fully extended(locked out) at the top of the movement. The cadence of each rep would be administered in a manner to avoid the bouncing and momentum so prevalent in fast, “jerky” push ups. In this style (“jerky”) there is no steady elbow lockout prior to the the eccentric phase and often times no chest contact with the floor. Very high reps are possible however.[/quote]

I’m not sure, but I think shibboleth may be asking about a loaded rest/pause at lockout. In 20 rep squats, for instance, one often uses a weight that they can only really get 10 reps one after the other. To get 20 the trainee pauses at the top of each rep, still loaded under the bar, but “resting” until he can continue. This is still thought of as 1 “set” because the bar is never put down.

Same could be said of pushups. Are we able to rest/pause at the top in the plank position working toward a max within a time limit (i.e. 2 minutes)? That’s how a lot of fitness tests work.

Either way, I can’t do it. [/quote]

The introduction of a time limit is, as it pertains to a fitness test, a different matter. The original topic was the performance of 100 push-ups with no performance criteria established.

It is concievable that a longer rest/pause will be utilized at the the top of the push up as one advances in repetitions and encounters fatigue build-up. However, the bottom line is the elbows are fully locked out at the top and a rigid plank body alignment is maintained.

Obviously the oxygen demands of an attempted 100 rep push up set will not compare to a 20 rep squat attempt with one’s TRUE 10-rep max resting on their upper back. Therefore, “resting” at the top excessively longer than that needed to demonstrate a fully locked out elbow position will only serve to accelerate fatigue. It’s not like you are going to need 5-10 deep breaths to force out push ups like you would a 20 rep squat set as the repetitions start to climb.

I used to be able to 103 in one set, full pushups as well. And im fat as fuck.

[quote]Marzouk wrote:
I used to be able to 103 in one set, full pushups as well. And im fat as fuck. [/quote]

Impressive indeed. What started to fatigue more noticeably toward the latter portion of the 100+ rep set,

  • Ability to maintain body alignment?

  • Chest, shoulders, triceps?

  • Overall systemic fatigue?

[quote]In10s wrote:

[quote]Marzouk wrote:
I used to be able to 103 in one set, full pushups as well. And im fat as fuck. [/quote]

Impressive indeed. What started to fatigue more noticeably toward the latter portion of the 100+ rep set,

  • Ability to maintain body alignment?

  • Chest, shoulders, triceps?

  • Overall systemic fatigue?[/quote]

At around 90 its that feeling you get where your limbs just stop working, keeping form wasn’t too diffcult, just overall fatigue

i use to be able to do 100, but havent tried in a while…i’ll try it again… i do not touch my chest to the ground. i’m a few inches off. i do lock out at the top. just curious as who can do 100 in 1 set…

[quote]Marzouk wrote:
I used to be able to 103 in one set, full pushups as well. And im fat as fuck. [/quote]

LOL no fucking way could you do 100 REAL pushups in one set.

I know alot of guys who claim they can do this sort of thing and literally not a single one of them does even one full ROM pushup.

With stuff like this 99% of people do a quarter movement at best at like 200mph.

[quote]In10s wrote: [quote]spk wrote: how many here can do 100 pushups in 1 set?[/quote] Depends on how these pushups are being performed. If they are all the way down (chest touches the floor) and all the way up ( a full elbow lockout with a distinct pause) and performed with a rigid plank-like body structure, I have to say not many out there can. Would be one hell of a feat of endurance and body control! [/quote]This x 1 million. The closest I have seen is in boxing gyms where there are EXTREMELY fit small guys (like lightweights or below) and they can pump them out like a motherfucker. The amount of fat guys who claim they can do this is fucking hilarious.

[quote]In10s wrote:

[quote]shibboleth wrote:
Does a pause at the top of the movement count towards the set or does it break it?

Either way I can’t do it. Nor do I really want to. But would be impressive to see.[/quote]

What? This is not that complicated. We’re talking a pause of a second in which the elbows are fully extended(locked out) at the top of the movement. The cadence of each rep would be administered in a manner to avoid the bouncing and momentum so prevalent in fast, “jerky” push ups. In this style (“jerky”) there is no steady elbow lockout prior to the the eccentric phase and often times no chest contact with the floor. Very high reps are possible however.[/quote]

LOL!!! You call that a pushup? That sounds more like a “Floor Sally”.

When I was deep in the world of pushups, it wasn’t a pushup unless done wide-grip knuckles down. Dick and lips would literally touch the ground on every rep, I kid you not. 2 second pause. 2 second eccentric. Don’t want anyone using BS explosive muscle power and cheating. 3 second pause at the top. You’ll find a lot of guys pausing for “one”–more like a quarter second. The long pause takes care of that. Talk about isometric strength! And of course a 2 second concentric. So that’s a 2-2-3-2 count.

That’s a pushup. Notice that a proper pushup takes nearly 10 seconds. I see ladies like you guys struggling to plank for a minute. Try and do a hundred pushups while you’re at it. Yeah, right. Not on your biceps day. Which is apparently every day.

If you’re doing a pushup, and it isn’t 10 seconds, I just don’t care. Call it a “Floor Sally”.

hahahahaha!!! wtf are these?

dudes not going down all the way…

i do mine like this guy. my hands are about an inch or two wider. i just dont touch the chest . i’m a few inches off the ground… 100 nonstop aint ez at all…

Back when I did a lot of calisthenics and used no free-weights, I decided that I wanted to be able to do a hundred push-ups.

Got to a point where I was able to do 50 in a single set. Was rather proud of myself. Then one day my core got strong enough to do actual push-ups instead of shitty ones where your lower body is dropping down, resulting in you only pushing the extreme upper part of your body up, and not the entire body. Only managed to do 15 real push-ups before my arms gave out on me.

Can do anywhere from 30-35 now with solid-form. I don’t even bother trying to do push-ups once I know my form is going to get sloppy on me. I don’t see the point.

I’ll echo anyone who thinks that they can do 100 push-ups needs to get someone to look at their form before they go bragging about it. Lots of people have shit push-up form but don’t realize it. It’s like those people who do squats with absolutely no ROM. They can’t see their form, so they don’t know that they’re failing at it.