T Nation

10,000 Hours

Reading a real good book by Canadian Malcolm Gladwell called the “Outliers” where he states that all the successful people in the world to the most part, worked 10,000 hours before they achieved greatness. So what do you guys think the same applies to bodybuilding?

Arnold said he started lifting at 14, on his official website, which would have been 1961. He won Mr.Olympia in 1970 for the first time 9 years later, which would have given him time to accumulate close to the 10,000 hours of success needed to become the best in the world.

Thoughts???

Well what comes into play here? Just training or other things?

You can’t put a time on bodybuilding like that.

Some bbers start late and develop fast, some the other way.

an interesting thought, but i am in agreement with eigieinhamr, I do not believe it would apply in this area.

to be best in the circle need a patience coz patience resulted success

s.k

Since that would equate to about 28 years or training one could assume that even the most genetically challenged would be able to build up to Arnold’s level. but as mentioned above, starting age and drug use influence Physic development significantly.

[quote]ryan15 wrote:
to be best in the circle need a patience coz patience resulted success

s.k

[/quote]

Wtf does this shit mean?

If doing it naturally then HELL yes 10,000 hours would be needed :slight_smile:

7 years later im still stuffing my face, same way its been said that to become one of the best at your chosen profession you need to spend around 3-4 hrs a day researching !

[quote]Pluto wrote:
Reading a real good book by Canadian Malcolm Gladwell called the “Outliers” where he states that all the successful people in the world to the most part, worked 10,000 hours before they achieved greatness. So what do you guys think the same applies to bodybuilding?

Arnold said he started lifting at 14, on his official website, which would have been 1961. He won Mr.Olympia in 1970 for the first time 9 years later, which would have given him time to accumulate close to the 10,000 hours of success needed to become the best in the world.

Thoughts???[/quote]

TC referenced Gladwell in “Why You Suck”. I found it fascinating that the 10,000 hour rule applied across a number of disciplines (violin, soccer, etc.). But, more interesting to me was 4000 hours gets you good but mediocre compared to the best. To the general population, 4000 hours would be almost fanatical commitment.

As Jim Collins stated in his book Good to Great, the enemy of great is actually good. When people, or companies, get to the stage where they feel they have progressed to the point where they are good enough they stop pushing for greatness.
I’m going to pick up “Outliers”.

In tennis, it’s said that you need about 10000 hours to become a pro player…

I’d believe it. If anyone believes that any successful person didn’t work their ass off and have alot of failures along the way, they need to open their eyes.

Of course the statistic is dependent on the activity. For example, lifting (bodybuilding, powerlifting, etc), if you lifted 1 hour everyday of the year for 20 years, you only amass 7300 hours. I guess you can make the case if you started at 15 (read above).

I was reading about this as well on a running message board I frequent. That is another sport that for some events, it’s near impossible. For distance runners, maybe it works out, but I don’t know any sprinters that can run that much. Maybe when they interviewed the people, they didn’t specify time doing the sport, rather time devoted to it. In which case, if you’re at practice, you could spend 3 hours there, with more than half that time sitting/standing around.

Read Tim Ferriss’ blog. He’s a master at… well mastering things quickly.

He pretty much cuts through all of the bullshit that would take you 10,000 hours to learn and distills it down to what he calls life hacking. Pretty cool shit.

Here’s his new T.V. show Trial by Fire covering his life hacking:

Some guy took a whole page to say on one of the threads around here. Don’t ask for opinions or others personal experience.

Go try it for yourself and see what happens.
He said trail and error is what you should do.

BTW-Just being sarcastic. Not to you though, just in general.

No matter what activity you refer to… Be that playing guitar or bodybuilding… You can train for 10000 hours and have amounted to very little or be totally mediocre still.

Depends on so many things.
If you are not constantly improving and pushing your boundaries, then nothing much will happen (obviously), no matter how long you train/play/whatever.

Most “overnight success stories” take at least 7 years.

TNT

[quote]Cephalic_Carnage wrote:
No matter what activity you refer to… Be that playing guitar or bodybuilding… You can train for 10000 hours and have amounted to very little or be totally mediocre still.

Depends on so many things.
If you are not constantly improving and pushing your boundaries, then nothing much will happen (obviously), no matter how long you train/play/whatever.
[/quote]

hell yeah man, im studying guitar in university and you can spend hours on end just playing around with that shit, never getting better, ever

You cannot compare BB, sprinting, strongman, or any other sport that is very one dimensional to typical sports with this rule.

I fully believe that the 10000 hr mark is definately valid. But in other sports, many hours aren’t spent going as hard as possible. Skill work is vitally important, but it doesn’t take much out of you and it improves your ability. That, I think, is one of the biggest differences. Plus there’s video tape studying, recovery days where the intensity is low, etc.