T Nation

1 Rep Max and Preventive Medicine

@ CT:

Any tips on preventing injury with going heavy on pressing movements, etc. There is a lot of pressing heavy from pins in the layers. I haven’t had any injuries…ever and don’t want any. I’ve noticed trying to push through sticking points on my max could really force some injury on some occations. I’m wondering if I should keep my Max’s to full reps with no sticking. For example once I stick terminate the rep.

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@ CT:

Any tips on preventing injury with going heavy on pressing movements, etc. There is a lot of pressing heavy from pins in the layers. I haven’t had any injuries…ever and don’t want any. I’ve noticed trying to push through sticking points on my max could really force some injury on some occations. I’m wondering if I should keep my Max’s to full reps with no sticking. For example once I stick terminate the rep. [/quote]

  1. Injuries will happen at some point if you lift weights and push your limits.

  2. It’s okay to grind a little bit but if you had to really fight to lock the rep out, don’t try and go heavier on the next round. Use that as your max. I wouldn’t just dump the weight mid rep because you hit a sticking point unless you really have to. That should be a last option for total failure, which you really shouldn’t hit if following CT’s training styles.

@corst:

What do you think about as the ramp gets closer to max adding +5 instead of +10 lb increments. Or simply us standard 10lb jumps in PR’s only. My thoughts are use what ever you can to get the weight up beyond the previous week…don’t wait for a 10lb only increase. If its 5 at least its something.

Never miss a lift. Best advice I’ve ever received on injury prevention concerning weight-lifting.

When you get to the point where the last set or rep was a grind and you’re not really sure whether you can hit the next one, either perform another set or two at the weight you just hit, or back down slightly and perform singles until you can’t get anymore quality reps in.

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@corst:

What do you think about as the ramp gets closer to max adding +5 instead of +10 lb increments. Or simply us standard 10lb jumps in PR’s only. My thoughts are use what ever you can to get the weight up beyond the previous week…don’t wait for a 10lb only increase. If its 5 at least its something.
[/quote]

It depends on the RM you’re going for. If it’s a 2 or 3, 5lb might be great, if it’s 1RM 10 might be better.

I think it depends on the lift, the lifter, the RM being sought after.

Missed reps don’t help anything.

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
Never miss a lift. Best advice I’ve ever received on injury prevention concerning weight-lifting.

When you get to the point where the last set or rep was a grind and you’re not really sure whether you can hit the next one, either perform another set or two at the weight you just hit, or back down slightly and perform singles until you can’t get anymore quality reps in.[/quote]

Agreed- it’s a hard thing to fully understand until you fail/miss reps 3 weeks in a row for no other reason than Ego and you can’t recover properly.

@db:

Thanks for the reply, this is in regards to CT’s 1 and 3 Rep Max Layer Training. Is that you in your avatar? Maybe at Burning Man in Nevada?

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@db:

Thanks for the reply, this is in regards to CT’s 1 and 3 Rep Max Layer Training. Is that you in your avatar? Maybe at Burning Man in Nevada? [/quote]

I don’t want to talk about my avatar. It’s a long story.

The way I look at it is this: if you leave a set or a rep in the tank, even if you think you might have had a pretty good shot at hitting the next weight, you save yourself that much more CNS drain and it translates to better performance on the next day’s workout. The thing with CT’s layering system and his HP Mass program is that, other than the cluster sets and the HDL sets, the focus really is on QUALITY reps, not QUANTITY of weight moved. The more efficient you get at a movement pattern, the better you get at performing it right?

Well, that efficiency comes from performing as many quality reps as you can on a given day, more or less. It’s different for everyone, but when I hit a true 1RM on a given movement, I’m fucking done for the rest of the workout. It’s simply that much more draining on the CNS. So, rather than hit that bigger weight, you’re better off performing more sets and reps at a slightly lower weight while moving the weight efficiently and with cleaner technique. I’d rather get multiple sets in while benching 85-95% of my 1RM than hit a new PR, simply because the return on that PR is nothing. I hit a new PR, but it has negative effects over the course of my following workouts, so the tradeoff is not really a net gain for me.

Instead, let your PRs come to you naturally. Let’s say you squat 385 for one pretty clean rep, but throwing 4 plates on the bar for the next set is a dicey proposition, based on how the set at 385 felt. At some point, and it could take a couple weeks or it might be the very next squat workout, 385 will get moved fast enough where you pretty much know that you can 405 on the next set. THAT is the time to move up in weight, not when it’s a coin flip as to whether you can hit it. It seems like it’s a slower progression that way, but in reality it isn’t because if you try to hit 405 when you probably shouldn’t be trying to, and then you bomb out on that set, the effect it has not only on the rest of that workout, but most likely the next few workouts, regardless of what movement pattern you are practicing, can be negative.

@db:

Nice, I get that.